Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Top management | Tim Luce, Head of Science & Operation

    What does a seven-year-old growing up in a small community in Arkansas know about what it means to be an 'atomic scientist'? Probably not much. Except, remember [...]

    Read more

  • Blanket shield blocks | Series production milestone in Korea

    It takes many months for a single forged block of stainless steel to be transformed into the complex shape of an ITER blanket shield block, full of gullies, cha [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | 5 top lid segments expected

    A little less than five years ago, in December 2015, the first segments of the ITER cryostat (out of a total of 54) were delivered to the construction site from [...]

    Read more

  • On site | As ITER begins assembly, HVAC becomes mission critical

    Not only will heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) help protect people and equipment during the assembly phase at ITER, but they will also help ensu [...]

    Read more

  • Vacuum vessel | Sector #6 is leak tight

    The first ITER vacuum vessel sector has passed a helium leak test on site with flying colours. Back in March 2020, as experts from the Korean Domestic Agency [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Wrapping up conductor fabrication

Sabina Griffith

Butt welding of two toroidal field conductor jackets at Nippon Steel Engineering in Kyushu, Japan. (Photo: Peter Ginter) (Click to view larger version...)
Butt welding of two toroidal field conductor jackets at Nippon Steel Engineering in Kyushu, Japan. (Photo: Peter Ginter)
This week, representatives from the ITER Organization and the six Domestic Agencies engaged in the production of ITER's magnets gathered together at the ITER Headquarters in Cadarache to assess the status of the magnet conductor production.

The conductors are a core component of the magnets and one of the longest lead-time items for the ITER Project.  As summarized by Arnaud Devred, ITER's Superconducting Systems Section Leader, the production of strands for both the toroidal and the poloidal field magnets made out of Nb3Sn and NbTi, respectively, is ongoing in all six Domestic Agencies. "As of today, 40 percent of strands required for the toroidal field magnets have been produced, which equals 165 tonnes of superconducting wire. All Domestic Agencies have successfully qualified their domestic suppliers and started to register the manufactured strands into the Conductor Database."

The panel this week also reviewed the latest test results of a conductor sample for the central solenoid, which recently showed some unexpected behaviour. Required to withstand 60,000 current pulses during plasma operation, the conductor test performed in November 2010 at the SULTAN facility in Switzerland revealed unacceptable degradation after only 6,000 pulses.

As ''a testimony of sympathy'' for their colleagues and friends at the Japanese Domestic Agency who could not join the meeting in Cadarache due to the recent events, the members took a group photo, signed it and emailed it to Japan. (Click to view larger version...)
As ''a testimony of sympathy'' for their colleagues and friends at the Japanese Domestic Agency who could not join the meeting in Cadarache due to the recent events, the members took a group photo, signed it and emailed it to Japan.
In order to assess and solve the problem, experts assembled at the Château de Cadarache this week agreed on a multiple-step approach: a series of tests will be performed over the next weeks and months aiming to find out whether the unsatisfactory performance is a result of the sample configuration, the sample preparation, or the conductor design itself. "These tests will be performed in parallel in order to save time and to enable the start of procurement," says Devred. "The SULTAN test serves as a risk mitigation strategy for launching production, but the true validation of the performance in conditions similar to the operating environment will be made by a long length of conductor."  This so-called central solenoid insert test will occur during the second half of 2013, when 50 metres of central solenoid conductor will be tested in the central solenoid model coil based in Naka, Japan that provides test conditions very similar to those in ITER.


return to the latest published articles