Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Central solenoid assembly | First sequences underway

    What does it take to assemble the magnet at the heart of ITER? Heavy lifting, unerring accuracy, and a human touch. The central solenoid will be assembled from [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly | The eyes of ITER

    Supervisors ensure compliance and completion as machine and plant assembly forges ahead. In Greek mythology, Argus was considered an ideal guardian because his [...]

    Read more

  • Component repairs | Removing, displacing and disassembling

    A good repair job starts with a cleared workbench, the right tools on hand and a strong vise. This axiom, true for odd jobs in a home workshop, is also true for [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly | Set of handling tools for in-vessel installation finalized

    Inside of a test facility that reproduces the volume and geometry of the ITER vacuum vessel environment, a team from CNIM Systèmes Industriels has dem [...]

    Read more

  • 360° image of the week | The assembly theatre

    Ever since it was invented almost two centuries ago, photography has tried to capture what the human eye actually sees. Despite huge progress achieved, it has n [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

HTS workshop for future fusion applications

 (Click to view larger version...)
In order to achieve superconductivity, the niobium-titanium (NbTi) and niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) conductors inside ITER's magnets will have to be cooled down with supercritical helium in the temperature range of 4 Kelvin (-269°C)—a process that requires substantial amounts of energy that impact the net energy gain. The efficiency of future fusion power plants could be drastically increased if superconductors could be operated at higher temperatures (> 65 K) using affordable liquid nitrogen, for example, instead of supercritical helium as coolant.

"Targeting a future commercial fusion machine, it may be very demanding to avoid liquid helium cooling for the coil system," Walter Fietz from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany writes in an article for Fusion Engineering and Design. "This would require less refrigeration power and allow omitting the radiation shield of the coils, resulting in a less complex cryostat and a size reduction of the machine."  

"Having a material at hand that can transport currents without losses, that would be a dream," says Jean-Luc Duchateau from CEA who developed the superconducting tokamak Tore Supra. There are many materials being tested in labs around the world. At KIT in Karlsruhe, scientists have been experimenting for many years with a material that holds all the promises for successful application in the harsh environment of a fusion reactor: Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide, a crystalline chemical compound abbreviated as "YBCO". The material's operating temperature is in the range of around 50 K and its physical behavior in high magnetic fields brings it very close to Jean-Luc Duchateau's dream come true. The downside, however, is that so far it has not been possible to produce reliable strands out of YBCO.
 
In order to coordinate international efforts, a workshop is being organized at KIT on 26-27 May to further investigate options of HTS for high current and high fields for DEMO and future fusion applications. The workshop's flyer can be downloaded here .


return to the latest published articles