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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A wide angle on progress

    Whether captured from the top of a crane or from a drone hovering at an altitude of a few dozen metres, the ITER site isalways spectacular. After almost seven y [...]

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  • Inside the arena

    A visit to the deep "well" where the ITER Tokamak assembly will begin next year begins with a journey underground ... through a maze of giant pillars, [...]

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  • 10,000 tonnes of magnets to cool

    In ITER, huge volumesof liquid helium will be circulated throughout a complex, five-kilometre network of pipes, pumps and valves to keep the 10,000-tonne magnet [...]

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  • Heaviest convoy yet

    The triple convoy that reached ITER on Thursday 13 April wasthe heaviest ever organized since the beginning of "highly exceptional" deliveries in Janu [...]

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  • Gouging the giant's eye

    On the side of the ITER bioshield that faces the main ITER office building, four large openings have been preserved to allow passage for the neutral beam inject [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

"Oui, ITER is a worthy challenge!"

The investment in ITER, writes CEA Chairman Bernard Bigot in a recent column in the French economic daily <i>Les Échos</i>, represents only 0.02% of the ITER Members' combined energy markets. (Click to view larger version...)
The investment in ITER, writes CEA Chairman Bernard Bigot in a recent column in the French economic daily Les Échos, represents only 0.02% of the ITER Members' combined energy markets.
"Oui, ITER is a worthy challenge!" writes CEA Chairman Bernard Bigot in a column published last Wednesday, 6 July in the French economic daily Les Échos.

"For the first time in our history, the energy situation calls for a formidable effort to develop the innovative technologies that will be necessary to cover our needs," stresses the French physicist who is also the High Representative for ITER in France. "With 9 billion inhabitants on Earth in 2050, each one of us knows that in the next decades we must find a way to reduce the proportion of fossil fuels consumed."

In Dr Bigot's view, renewable energies cannot, alone, fill the gap. "The energy mix of the future will necessarily include baseload electricity generation, complemented by renewable energy sources. A call for nuclear energy is inevitable to replace, in part, fossile resources."

While Fukushima has acted as a reminder of the inherent risks of nuclear energy if safety is not raised to an "absolute priority," mankind must now turn to "exploring the potential of fusion energy," argues Dr Bigot.

And for an investment that represents only 0.02 percent of the Members' combined energy markets, ITER is the way to do it.

Click here to read Bernard Bigot's column in Les Échos.



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