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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Real-time collaboration delivers for fusion computing

    A key computing system for ITER is now being trialled at the European tokamak JET, following collaboration betweenteams at the UK's Culham Centre for Fusion Ene [...]

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  • The balance of power

    It comes as no surprise that the French railway operator SNCF is the largest consumer of electricity in the country—it takes a lot of megawatts to power 500 sup [...]

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  • "Dummy" winding takes shape

    As orange lights flash and machines softly hum, layer one of a 'dummy' pancake winding (the building block of a poloidal field coil) is taking shape on the wind [...]

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  • As big (and heavy) as a whale

    It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on [...]

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  • A passage to India

    108 days, 10,200 kilometres, 16 countries, and only two flat tires. These are the remarkable statistics of a no-less-remarkable journey: a father and son who tr [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

USA joining the Wendelstein 7-X fusion project

-Isabella Milch, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics

The outer vessel of Wendelstein 7-X is equipped with a variety of ports. In blue, the five auxiliary coils provided by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will help the precise setting of the magnetic fields at the plasma edge. (Graphic: IPP) (Click to view larger version...)
The outer vessel of Wendelstein 7-X is equipped with a variety of ports. In blue, the five auxiliary coils provided by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will help the precise setting of the magnetic fields at the plasma edge. (Graphic: IPP)
The USA is investing over USD 7.5 million in the construction of the Wendelstein 7-X fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. In the three-year project, starting in 2011, scientists from the fusion institutes at Princeton, Oak Ridge and Los Alamos are contributing auxiliary magnetic coils, measuring instruments and planning of special sections of the wall cladding for equipping the German fusion device—one of a total of nine projects in the Innovative Approaches to Fusion program of the USA Department of Energy who will accordingly become a partner in the Wendelstein 7-X research program.

Click here to read the Press Release.


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