Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Fusion machines | The second-hand market

    Whatever their size, fusion devices are fine pieces of technology that are complex to design and expensive to build. As research progresses and experimental pro [...]

    Read more

  • Manufacturing in China | A set of clamps to resist all loads

    China is providing an extensive array of supports and clamps for ITER's superconducting magnet systems—in all, more than 1,600 tonnes of equipment. On 9 June, t [...]

    Read more

  • Power electronics | Coaxial cables arrive from Russia

    Thirty-eight reels of cable on 13 specially equipped trailers ... the recent convoy of electrotechnical equipment shipped by the Russian Domestic Agency was the [...]

    Read more

  • Conference|Lions and mammoths and cave bears—oh my!

    Separated by less than 200 kilometres in space—but by 36,000 years in time—the ITER Tokamak and the Chauvet Cave may seem to have little in common. But to scien [...]

    Read more

  • Neutral beam test facility | First ITER test bed enters operation

    For all those who had contributed to designing and building the world's largest negative ion source, it was a deeply symbolic moment. ITER Director-General Bern [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

USA joining the Wendelstein 7-X fusion project

Isabella Milch, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics

The outer vessel of Wendelstein 7-X is equipped with a variety of ports. In blue, the five auxiliary coils provided by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will help the precise setting of the magnetic fields at the plasma edge. (Graphic: IPP) (Click to view larger version...)
The outer vessel of Wendelstein 7-X is equipped with a variety of ports. In blue, the five auxiliary coils provided by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory will help the precise setting of the magnetic fields at the plasma edge. (Graphic: IPP)
The USA is investing over USD 7.5 million in the construction of the Wendelstein 7-X fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. In the three-year project, starting in 2011, scientists from the fusion institutes at Princeton, Oak Ridge and Los Alamos are contributing auxiliary magnetic coils, measuring instruments and planning of special sections of the wall cladding for equipping the German fusion device—one of a total of nine projects in the Innovative Approaches to Fusion program of the USA Department of Energy who will accordingly become a partner in the Wendelstein 7-X research program.

Click here to read the Press Release.


return to the latest published articles