Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

    Read more

  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

    Read more

  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

    Read more

  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

    Read more

  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Cryodistribution passes review

-Hyun-Sik Chang, Cryogenic Distribution Engineer

The fourth and last CDR of the ITER Cryogenic System—Cryodistribution—was conducted on 20-21 July. (Click to view larger version...)
The fourth and last CDR of the ITER Cryogenic System—Cryodistribution—was conducted on 20-21 July.
The fourth and last Conceptual Design Review (CDR) for the ITER cryogenic system was held this week. The CDR for cryodistribution was conducted during 20-21 July, successfully meeting all requirements.
 
The main function of the ITER cryogenic system is to cool down and maintain the required cryogenic operating conditions of the ITER cold components such as the magnets, the cryopumps and the in-tokamak thermal shields. The cryoplant on the ITER platform will produce the required cooling power at the three required operating temperature levels, namely at 4 K, 50 K, and 80 K.
 
The distribution of cooling power will be accomplished through a set of cryodistribution cold boxes, which control the cooling power into the ITER cold components by forced flow.
 
A unique feature of ITER cryodistribution is the mass flow rate of the cold rotating machines: the machines will have a mass flow rate that ranges up to 3 kg/s whereas existing limits are around 1 kg/sec. Such high flow rates are necessary to satisfy the cooling requirements of the ITER superconducting magnet system ... another unique system in many ways.
 
With the successful conclusion of the cryodistribution CDR, the conceptual design of ITER's cryogenic system is now completed and the way paved for the construction of the world's second largest cryogenic facility (following CERN).



return to the latest published articles