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Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Cryodistribution passes review

-Hyun-Sik Chang, Cryogenic Distribution Engineer

The fourth and last CDR of the ITER cryogenic system—cryodistribution—was conducted on 20-21 July. (Click to view larger version...)
The fourth and last CDR of the ITER cryogenic system—cryodistribution—was conducted on 20-21 July.
The fourth and last Conceptual Design Review (CDR) for the ITER cryogenic system was held this week. The CDR for cryodistribution was conducted during 20-21 July, successfully meeting all requirements.
 
The main function of the ITER cryogenic system is to cool down and maintain the required cryogenic operating conditions of the ITER cold components such as the magnets, the cryopumps and the in-tokamak thermal shields. The cryoplant on the ITER platform will produce the required cooling power at the three required operating temperature levels, namely at 4 K, 50 K, and 80 K.
 
The distribution of cooling power will be accomplished through a set of cryodistribution cold boxes, which control the cooling power into the ITER cold components by forced flow.
 
A unique feature of ITER cryodistribution is the mass flow rate of the cold rotating machines: the machines will have a mass flow rate that ranges up to 3 kg/s whereas existing limits are around 1 kg/sec. Such high flow rates are necessary to satisfy the cooling requirements of the ITER superconducting magnet system ... another unique system in many ways.
 
With the successful conclusion of the cryodistribution CDR, the conceptual design of ITER's cryogenic system is now completed and the way paved for the construction of the world's second largest cryogenic facility (following CERN).



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