Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Real-time collaboration delivers for fusion computing

    A key computing system for ITER is now being trialled at the European tokamak JET, following collaboration betweenteams at the UK's Culham Centre for Fusion Ene [...]

    Read more

  • The balance of power

    It comes as no surprise that the French railway operator SNCF is the largest consumer of electricity in the country—it takes a lot of megawatts to power 500 sup [...]

    Read more

  • "Dummy" winding takes shape

    As orange lights flash and machines softly hum, layer one of a 'dummy' pancake winding (the building block of a poloidal field coil) is taking shape on the wind [...]

    Read more

  • As big (and heavy) as a whale

    It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on [...]

    Read more

  • A passage to India

    108 days, 10,200 kilometres, 16 countries, and only two flat tires. These are the remarkable statistics of a no-less-remarkable journey: a father and son who tr [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Witnessing the fabrication of ITER hardware

-Sabina Griffith

SFA showing its professional approach, even when welcoming a visitor. (Click to view larger version...)
SFA showing its professional approach, even when welcoming a visitor.
When running an international enterprise like ITER, with colleagues all over the world, it is indispensable to have regular, personal interaction. ITER Director-General Osamu Motojima set off to Korea during the first week of October on this very mission: visit some of the manufacturing facilities where ITER components are taking shape and meet Myeun Kwon, former Director of the KSTAR Research Centre and newly appointed president of the Korean National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI), and Gyung-Su Lee, Chairman of the ITER Management Advisory Committee (MAC).

The first stop was SFA Engineering, an automation equipment company with vast experience in nuclear fusion. In March 2010, SFA signed a contract with the Korean Domestic Agency for the design of 18 custom assembly tools.
 
ITER DG Motojima visiting Hyundai Heavy Industries. To verify the design and manufacturing feasibility for the vacuum vessel sectors, HHI has fabricated three types of full scale mockups. (Click to view larger version...)
ITER DG Motojima visiting Hyundai Heavy Industries. To verify the design and manufacturing feasibility for the vacuum vessel sectors, HHI has fabricated three types of full scale mockups.
The following day, a visit to Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) and its sub-supplier Ilsung was on the agenda. Both companies are located in Ulsan, South Korea's seventh-largest metropolis. HHI, the largest ship-building company in the world, will manufacture sectors 1 and 6 of the nine-sector ITER Vacuum Vessel. As subcontractor to HHI (contract signed in August 2010) Ilsung will be responsible for manufacturing the equatorial and lower ports for these sectors.

In order to verify the design and manufacturing feasibility of the vacuum vessel sectors, HHI has fabricated three types of full scale mock-ups: The Inboard Segment Mock-up (VISM) for electron beam welding process optimization and the inner wall shielding assembly trial; the Vacuum Vessel Upper Segment Mock-up (VUSM) for process optimization, assembly feasibility and a welding distortion study between outer shell and flexible support housings; and the Vacuum Vessel Lower Segment Triangular Support Mock-up (VLTM) for a study of fabrication feasibility.

A group photo with the Dawonsys team in front of the AC/DC converter prototype. (Click to view larger version...)
A group photo with the Dawonsys team in front of the AC/DC converter prototype.
In addition to assembly tooling and the manufacture of two vacuum vessel sectors, Korea also has procurement responsibility for the AC/DC converters for the ITER switchyard. Director-General Motojima made a final stop to Dawonsys, under contract with the Korean Domestic Agency to perform prototype R&D and testing. Dawonsys provided the power systems for the superconducting magnets as well as the high-voltage power system for the KSTAR Tokamak.

All assemblies—from the output of DC busbars, to the input of AC busbars, to a full-scale, six-pulse central solenoid converter unit—were engineered and integrated in the prototypes. Essential parameters such as temperature rise at rated current, good current sharing among paralleled thyristors, fuse coordination, and the soundness of the converter structure over the electromagnetic stress at fault condition were confirmed by the prototype converter.

The contract for AC/DC converters signed on 12 August between the Korean Domestic Agency and Dawonsys is expected to run for seven years, and covers the design, fabrication, site assembly and installation, and technical assistance during the integrated circuit test. The converters for ITER's toroidal field and central solenoid coils, vertical stability coils and correction coils (including master controllers, a dummy load, and spares) are deliverables on the contract.

In order to verify design and manufacturing feasibility, KO-DA has fabricated the Port Stub Extension (PSE) of nine lower ports. Currently the upper (photo) and lower parts of the inner shell are under fabrication. (Click to view larger version...)
In order to verify design and manufacturing feasibility, KO-DA has fabricated the Port Stub Extension (PSE) of nine lower ports. Currently the upper (photo) and lower parts of the inner shell are under fabrication.
"This was a very nice occasion to confirm the progress of real manufacturing and the large potential of the involved Korean institutions", DG Motojima summarized his impressions.

We'd like to thank Junho Ko from ITER Korea for his contribution to this article.


return to the latest published articles