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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Image of the week | Shiny steel and sharp edges

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  • Vacuum vessel sector #6 | On its way

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  • Top management | Keun-Kyeong Kim, Head of Construction

    In the small Korean village (25 houses!) where Keun-Kyeong Kim spent the first eight years of his life, there was no electricity— just batteries to power transi [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Connecting the brain to the heart

Sabina Griffith

Celebrating the milestone: More than 50,000 cables serving the Tokamak Complex have been identified and uploaded into the cable database. (Click to view larger version...)
Celebrating the milestone: More than 50,000 cables serving the Tokamak Complex have been identified and uploaded into the cable database.
If the tokamak is the heart of ITER then the cables are the central nervous system that connects the body of the machine to its brain. To date, 50,373 cables have been identified and registered in the ITER cable database and the number is increasing daily as the anatomy of ITER develops.

There was consternation during the 2007 ITER Design Review—which scrutinized the ITER design down to the last bolt—when it was realized that cable engineering tasks to build up a centralized cable and routing database had not been incorporated.

This task was subsequently assigned to the Electrical Engineering Division and a working group was established to consider the various requirements for high and low voltage power cables and the more sensitive Instrumentation & Control (I&C) cables used for diagnostics.

Ivone Benfatto, Jashwant Sonara, David Beltran, Joel Hourtoule and the work group established within the Electrical Engineering Division now have their heads above the water... (Click to view larger version...)
Ivone Benfatto, Jashwant Sonara, David Beltran, Joel Hourtoule and the work group established within the Electrical Engineering Division now have their heads above the water...
"When we first started this exercise, we were overwhelmed by the numerous requirements from the users," remembers Jashwant Sonara, electrical engineer, who was sent to the project from the Indian Domestic Agency in spring 2010. One-and-a-half years later, Jashwant, David Beltran and Joel Hourtoule have their heads above the water line and are now managing (Jashwant perfers the word "integrating") the labyrinth of cables that will serve the Tokamak Complex via trays, racks and towers.

The working group has been greatly supported over the past 18 months by the CAD designers who have uploaded an incredible amount of data into the centralized Cable Database.

Thanks to Jashwant Sonara for his contribution to this article.


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