Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

    Read more

  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

    Read more

  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

    Read more

  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

    Read more

  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

F4E signs long-term collaboration in diagnostics

-Samina Shamsie, Fusion for Energy

Diagnostic sensors are located within the interior and the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Shown here: conduits (1), cable looms (2), and a conduit cross-section (3) where cable looms and filler material (in yellow) are visible. (Click to view larger version...)
Diagnostic sensors are located within the interior and the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Shown here: conduits (1), cable looms (2), and a conduit cross-section (3) where cable looms and filler material (in yellow) are visible.
The European Domestic Agency has signed its first Framework Partnership Agreement (FPA) for the design of diagnostic components. Amounting to EUR 3.7 million, and covering a period of up to four years, the FPA has been awarded to a consortium consisting of three laboratories from the Hungarian fusion association: Wigner RCP (formerly KFKI RMKI); MTA EK (formerly KFKI AEKI); and the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.

The agreement concerns the infrastructure (cabling, conduits, feedthroughs, connectors) for the diagnostic systems and covers R&D, engineering, quality control and testing from functional specifications. This is an important step in the drive for First Plasma, as many of these components must be installed during the first stage of ITER assembly.

So what exactly is a Framework Partnership Agreement? It establishes a long-term collaboration (for up to four years) with a beneficiary or consortium. The Agreement defines a set of rules for the accomplishment of the work; with the work itself performed under separate, specific grant agreements.

The FPA is well-fitted to projects requiring mostly R&D and early design. It is ideal for diagnostics, where designs are usually 'first-of-a-kind' and require a large, specialized design base the continuity of the design team.

A further advantage of the FPA is that it enables the European Domestic Agency (F4E) to have a stronger project management role.

This first FPA will bring together the work of some 30 people per year. F4E is expecting to award FPAs for most of the major diagnostic systems under its responsibility during 2012.

Further information on F4E's first Framework Partnership Agreement can be found here.


return to the latest published articles