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Latest ITER Newsline

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Of Interest

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"Awesome!"

Véronique Marfaing

Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston. (Click to view larger version...)
Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston.
On 12 March, twenty American students from Bentley University (Boston) visited ITER.

Their visit was part of a nine-day tour in France within the context of Bachelor of Science studies and a course on energy economics. Before coming to ITER, they had visited French EDF electrical facilities.

The students' main interests concerned the economics of energy, but they also showed interest in the international nature of the ITER project. Philippe Chappuis from the Tokamak Directorate presented them with a wide overview of the technical challenges of the machine and the scientific collaboration.

One of the twenty-year-old students—Irene Pasquale, interested in working later on environmental matters—commented: "This giant project is awesome! It's really interesting to see the construction phase."

John Richard Tommasi, the professor accompanying the group, promised that his students would continue to follow ITER progress upon their return and that he would return with another group in the near future.


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