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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

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  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

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  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

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  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

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  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

"Awesome!"

-Véronique Marfaing

Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston. (Click to view larger version...)
Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston.
On 12 March, twenty American students from Bentley University (Boston) visited ITER.

Their visit was part of a nine-day tour in France within the context of Bachelor of Science studies and a course on energy economics. Before coming to ITER, they had visited French EDF electrical facilities.

The students' main interests concerned the economics of energy, but they also showed interest in the international nature of the ITER project. Philippe Chappuis from the Tokamak Directorate presented them with a wide overview of the technical challenges of the machine and the scientific collaboration.

One of the twenty-year-old students—Irene Pasquale, interested in working later on environmental matters—commented: "This giant project is awesome! It's really interesting to see the construction phase."

John Richard Tommasi, the professor accompanying the group, promised that his students would continue to follow ITER progress upon their return and that he would return with another group in the near future.


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