Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The making of a ring coil—a photo story

    From one end to the other of the on-site manufacturing facility for poloidal field coils, the different production stations are now clearly delimited, with tool [...]

    Read more

  • An unexpected fusion spinoff: aircraft carrier catapult

    The US company General Atomics is fabricating the 'beating heart of ITER,' an electromagnet called the central solenoid that is so large and powerful, that its [...]

    Read more

  • First steps towards "energizing"

    It takes more than the flipping of a switch to connect the ITER site to the French national grid. The operation, called a 'first energizing,' is a complex, step [...]

    Read more

  • The bioshield rises

    The bioshield structure is rising at the heart of the Tokamak Building. The last plot of the B1 level was poured last week; about half of the first ground level [...]

    Read more

  • Barcelona Supercomputer Center and ITER strengthen ties

    In a Memorandum of Understanding signed on 12 January 2017, the ITER Organization and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) in Spain have agreed 'to promote [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

"Awesome!"

-Véronique Marfaing

Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston. (Click to view larger version...)
Professor Tommasi and students from Bentley University in Boston.
On 12 March, twenty American students from Bentley University (Boston) visited ITER.

Their visit was part of a nine-day tour in France within the context of Bachelor of Science studies and a course on energy economics. Before coming to ITER, they had visited French EDF electrical facilities.

The students' main interests concerned the economics of energy, but they also showed interest in the international nature of the ITER project. Philippe Chappuis from the Tokamak Directorate presented them with a wide overview of the technical challenges of the machine and the scientific collaboration.

One of the twenty-year-old students—Irene Pasquale, interested in working later on environmental matters—commented: "This giant project is awesome! It's really interesting to see the construction phase."

John Richard Tommasi, the professor accompanying the group, promised that his students would continue to follow ITER progress upon their return and that he would return with another group in the near future.


return to the latest published articles