Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

    It has been likened to the filter of a swimming pool or an oversized ashtray. It has been called alien in shape and hellish in its affinity for heat. But whatev [...]

    Read more

  • Council milestone #50 | The way to assembly is open

    Passing an ITER Council milestone is always an achievement. Passing this milestone at this moment is much more than that: it is a demonstration that, despite th [...]

    Read more

  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

    Read more

  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

    Read more

  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Ready to hand over to industry



This model of an ITER cryopump that the vacuum team appears to be hauling out of Building 525 represents many years of development, which were recently finalized at ITER. 

The "built to print" design of this eight-tonne component (shown here at 2:3 scale) requires no less than 250 technical drawings to enable it to be manufactured to the precise standards required for the ITER Tokamak.

Detailing the design down to the smallest bolt was essential for this high-performance component to fulfil its demanding functions on ITER. The vacuum team is celebrating its completion.
Tender actions by both ITER Organization and the European Domestic Agency, Fusion For Energy, have been issued for the manufacturing of the first full-size cryopumps, which will be assembled by industry and tested at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany.

"Cryopumps are among the most complex of ITER components," say both Vacuum Section Head Robert Pearce and Matthias Dremel, who led the final design phase. "These pumps are unique. They contain the world's largest all-metal high vacuum valve and operate with 4.5 K (minus 268.5 °C) cryogens in the harsh environment of the heart of the ITER machine."

After creating a high vacuum inside the Tokamak chamber, six torus cryopumps will have the responsibility of taking impurities and the helium ash out of the plasma, thus enabling ITER to sustain its full performance.

Two more cryopumps will be installed on the cryostat to maintain the low pressure required for the operation of the magnets.


return to the latest published articles