Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Real-time collaboration delivers for fusion computing

    A key computing system for ITER is now being trialled at the European tokamak JET, following collaboration betweenteams at the UK's Culham Centre for Fusion Ene [...]

    Read more

  • The balance of power

    It comes as no surprise that the French railway operator SNCF is the largest consumer of electricity in the country—it takes a lot of megawatts to power 500 sup [...]

    Read more

  • "Dummy" winding takes shape

    As orange lights flash and machines softly hum, layer one of a 'dummy' pancake winding (the building block of a poloidal field coil) is taking shape on the wind [...]

    Read more

  • As big (and heavy) as a whale

    It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on [...]

    Read more

  • A passage to India

    108 days, 10,200 kilometres, 16 countries, and only two flat tires. These are the remarkable statistics of a no-less-remarkable journey: a father and son who tr [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Korean school books to bridge the cultural gap

Posing for the history books: Korean mothers with Jung Rye Choi, attachée from the Korean Embassy in Paris; Jean-Paul Clement, director of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur International School; Kijung Jung, head of the Korean Domestic Agency; and Bernard Dubreuil, the new Rector of the Aix-Marseille Academy. (Click to view larger version...)
Posing for the history books: Korean mothers with Jung Rye Choi, attachée from the Korean Embassy in Paris; Jean-Paul Clement, director of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur International School; Kijung Jung, head of the Korean Domestic Agency; and Bernard Dubreuil, the new Rector of the Aix-Marseille Academy.
ITER, the world's largest international research project, is not only a technical and diplomatic challenge. For the employees from more than 27 countries who—together with their families—have moved to southern France, it is also a cultural experiment. How will their relatives settle in this foreign country? How will their children adopt to a new language, a new school system and, finally, a very different curriculum from what they are used to?

"As we are aware of the challenges of living abroad, we are pleased to hand over some 30 Korean school books that shall enable families to measure their children's scholastic achievements and to catch up with the curricula when they return to their home country one day," Head of the Korean Domestic Agency, Kijung Jung, said during the small handover ceremony that took place at Manosque's Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur International School last week.

More than 200 books had been donated last year and the next donation is already in the planning. At the request of some involved mothers, Kijung Jung is likely to have some books on cultural studies and liberal arts in his suitcase on his next trip to Cadarache.


return to the latest published articles