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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Neutral beam injection | How ELISE is contributing to ITER

    ITER's neutral beam injection system is based on a radio frequency source that has been the subject of decades of development in Europe. At Max Planck Institute [...]

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  • Image of the week | Almost there

    The Tokamak Building has reached its maximum height ... in terms of concrete that is. The 'jewel box' in reinforced concrete will grow no more; instead, it will [...]

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  • Powerful lasers | A mockup to demonstrate safety

    During ITER operation, high-powered lasers will gather important diagnostic information on the properties and behaviour of the plasma, such as density, temperat [...]

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  • Cryostat | Lower cylinder revealed

    They were all there: those who designed it, those who forged it, those who assembled and welded it, and those who closely monitored the requirements and procedu [...]

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  • Europe's DEMO | What it could be like

    It looks like ITER, feels like ITER, but it's not ITER. In this depiction of what the site layout for the next-step fusion machine, DEMO, might look like in Eur [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Predicting the neutrons' impact

Lynne Degitz, US ITER

Standing in front of a neutronics model of ITER: (left to right) Ed Marriott, Tim Bohm, Paul Wilson, Mohamed Sawan and Ahmad Ibrahim, US ITER researchers at the University of Wisconsin. (Click to view larger version...)
Standing in front of a neutronics model of ITER: (left to right) Ed Marriott, Tim Bohm, Paul Wilson, Mohamed Sawan and Ahmad Ibrahim, US ITER researchers at the University of Wisconsin.
US ITER researchers at the University of Wisconsin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing advanced processes to assess ITER's unique tokamak components and materials in the presence of the tremendous amount of neutron flux and energy released by fusion reactions. The process, called neutronics analysis, involves a palette of complex computational codes and libraries for predicting neutron impacts.

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