Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The crown's jewels

    They are the jewels of the concrete crown that will support the combined mass of the Tokamak and its surrounding cryostat: 18 perfectly polished, chrome-plated [...]

    Read more

  • "Making the best of fusion installations in Europe"

    With the recent addition of the Ukraine's Kharkov Institute for Physics and Technology (KIPT), the EUROfusion consortium now encompasses 30 European fusion labo [...]

    Read more

  • New cryostat manufacturing milestone

    They all gathered—members of the ITER-India team and contractor Larsen & Toubro—to mark a portentous moment: the start of manufacturing on the upper cylinde [...]

    Read more

  • Key power supply elements pass tests in Russia

    Since the signature of a Procurement Arrangement in 2011 with Russia for switching networks, fast discharge units, DC busbars and instrumentation—all key elemen [...]

    Read more

  • First vessel subassembly achieved in Europe

    Nine massive steel sectors deliveredby the Domestic Agencies of Europe (five sectors) and Korea (four sectors) will be welded together on site during the assemb [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

UV light from plasma to etch next-generation chips

Xenon plasma produced in this laboratory equipment generates the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) wavelentgh that should provide the light output that the microprocessor industry needs. © University of Washington (Click to view larger version...)
Xenon plasma produced in this laboratory equipment generates the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) wavelentgh that should provide the light output that the microprocessor industry needs. © University of Washington
Light is the etching tool industry uses to create the microscopic circuits on the surface of silicon microprocessors. As "chips" follow Moore's law and become more powerful with each new generation, the features on the silicon become denser, meaning smaller structures need to be etched.

The short-wave (193 nanometres) ultraviolet light that is currently used by the industry is neither "sharp" nor powerful enough to meet the next generations' standards. What industry needs is light with an even shorter wavelength—less than one-tenth the present one—that will enable the etching of even finer grooves.

Such extreme ultraviolet light can be created only from plasmas. Scientists at the University of Washington College of Engineering have developed a "low-cost version of a fusion reactor," dubbed ZaP, that should provide the light output that the microprocessor industry needs.
 
Read the full story here


return to the latest published articles