Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

    Read more

  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

    Read more

  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

    Read more

  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

    Read more

  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Assessing ITER progress for the US legislators

''We never quite realized until today the sheer size of the project and the state of development it has reached already,'' said the visitors from the US Senate and House of Representatives. They are seen here at the Tokamak Seismic Pit with ITER's Tim Watson and Caroline Forestier, who works for the European site team. (Click to view larger version...)
''We never quite realized until today the sheer size of the project and the state of development it has reached already,'' said the visitors from the US Senate and House of Representatives. They are seen here at the Tokamak Seismic Pit with ITER's Tim Watson and Caroline Forestier, who works for the European site team.
Through their respective Appropriations Committees, the United States Senate and House of Representatives oversee the billions of federal dollars allocated to different projects.

While projects are closely monitored by way of regular reports and meetings, it is important for the US legislators to get a concrete experience of their reality. This is even more necessary when a project is located outside the US and is part of a larger international collaboration, like ITER.

Senators and Congresspeople, however, are very busy and often rely on close aides to "see on the ground" the projects they have to assess.

Three of these congressional and senatorial aides, plus a press secretary in the House of Representatives, visited ITER last week, met with Director-General Osamu Motojima and ITER Organization senior management, and were given an extensive tour of the work site. They were all highly impressed by what they saw.

"When we deal with our participation in the ITER Project," explained one of the visitors, "we naturally focus on the components that are procured by the US Domestic Agency, so we never quite realized until today the sheer size of the project, and the state of development it has reached already. Also, it was important for us to see beyond the US contribution to the project and take full measure of the international dimension of ITER."


return to the latest published articles