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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

"They want to light a star!"

 (Click to view larger version...)
For almost one century—it was founded in 1913—the French monthly Science et Vie (circ. 290,000) has brought the marvels of science and technology to an ever-expanding public.

In 1988, Science et Vie Junior, aimed at the 11 to 17 age group, was created as an offspring of the main magazine. The editors had realized that reaching teenagers required a different approach, both in the layout and in the language used.

Science et Vie Junior, however, explores the same world as its more senior Science et Vie. This month for instance, the magazine publishes a special issue on "the different states of matter," promising its young audience they will remain scotchés ("mesmerized") by what they will discover.

The ITER Project was cited as a mesmerizing example of the use of plasma. Six full pages are devoted to the physicists, Richard Pitts among them, who "want to light a star" in Cadarache and extract "as much energy from one litre of water as one gets from burning 1,000 litres of oil."

The article is remarkably clear and explanatory—an ideal entry point for anybody, aged 11-17 or not, wishing to understand what the ITER project is all about.

Science et Vie Junior, Hors série n°96, octobre 2012, € 5.50



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