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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Port cells | All 46 doors in place

    In ITER, ordinary objects and features often take on an awesome dimension. Take the doors that seal off the port cells around the Tokamak for instance. Doors th [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | Two make a pair

    One of the essential 'building blocks' of the ITER Tokamak is the pre-assembly of two toroidal field coils, one vacuum vessel sector and corresponding panels of [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Cryostat manufacturing comes to an end in India

    With a flag-off ceremony on 30 June, India's L&T Heavy Engineering marked the end of an eight-year industrial adventure—the manufacturing of the ITER cryost [...]

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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

"They want to light a star!"

 (Click to view larger version...)
For almost one century—it was founded in 1913—the French monthly Science et Vie (circ. 290,000) has brought the marvels of science and technology to an ever-expanding public.

In 1988, Science et Vie Junior, aimed at the 11 to 17 age group, was created as an offspring of the main magazine. The editors had realized that reaching teenagers required a different approach, both in the layout and in the language used.

Science et Vie Junior, however, explores the same world as its more senior Science et Vie. This month for instance, the magazine publishes a special issue on "the different states of matter," promising its young audience they will remain scotchés ("mesmerized") by what they will discover.

The ITER Project was cited as a mesmerizing example of the use of plasma. Six full pages are devoted to the physicists, Richard Pitts among them, who "want to light a star" in Cadarache and extract "as much energy from one litre of water as one gets from burning 1,000 litres of oil."

The article is remarkably clear and explanatory—an ideal entry point for anybody, aged 11-17 or not, wishing to understand what the ITER project is all about.

Science et Vie Junior, Hors série n°96, octobre 2012, € 5.50



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