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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • WEST | Revamped tokamak completes 1st phase of operation

    One day, in the latter half of this decade, it will be routine at ITER: dozens of operators, with eyes riveted to their individual monitors as numbers, graphs a [...]

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  • Roof modules | Patience, precision and a crane's long arm

    In the spring of 2020 a new and strategic phase of ITER construction will begin: the assembly of the ITER Tokamak. In order to deliver machine components to the [...]

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  • Image of the week | "Bringing light and hope"

    Most international organizations are headquartered in large cities—the UN in New York, UNESCO and the International Energy Agency in Paris, the IAEA in Vienna, [...]

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  • Outreach in China | A week devoted to fusion

    A new biennial event in China seeks to create a comprehensive exchange platform for the scientists, engineers and industries that are driving the country's stro [...]

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  • Monaco-ITER Fellows | New campaign announced

    The seventh recruitment campaign for the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship program opens on 13 January. Since 2008, thirty postdocs have carried out origin [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

"They want to light a star!"

 (Click to view larger version...)
For almost one century—it was founded in 1913—the French monthly Science et Vie (circ. 290,000) has brought the marvels of science and technology to an ever-expanding public.

In 1988, Science et Vie Junior, aimed at the 11 to 17 age group, was created as an offspring of the main magazine. The editors had realized that reaching teenagers required a different approach, both in the layout and in the language used.

Science et Vie Junior, however, explores the same world as its more senior Science et Vie. This month for instance, the magazine publishes a special issue on "the different states of matter," promising its young audience they will remain scotchés ("mesmerized") by what they will discover.

The ITER Project was cited as a mesmerizing example of the use of plasma. Six full pages are devoted to the physicists, Richard Pitts among them, who "want to light a star" in Cadarache and extract "as much energy from one litre of water as one gets from burning 1,000 litres of oil."

The article is remarkably clear and explanatory—an ideal entry point for anybody, aged 11-17 or not, wishing to understand what the ITER project is all about.

Science et Vie Junior, Hors série n°96, octobre 2012, € 5.50



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