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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The magnet lab next door

    Two and a half years ago ITER and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) entered a collaborationto prepare for the challenging task [...]

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  • Activity on every floor

    At every floor of the Tokamak Complex—from the lowest underground level (B2) all the way to the second regular level of the bioshield (L2)—there is intense acti [...]

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  • Bringing the Research Plan up to date

    The ITER Research Plan is an ITER baseline document which outlines the main lines of science and technology research derived from the project's mission goals. [...]

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  • Further validation for ring magnet fabrication

    Once a component mockup has been produced—and before fabrication can begin on the actual component or system—a manufacturing readiness review is required to ens [...]

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  • First central solenoid module ready for heat treatment

    In a major milestone, the US contractor responsible for the fabrication of the ITER central solenoid has successfully joined seven individual coil sections, or [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Measuring hard-to-diagnose 3D plasmas

A simulated plasma in the Large Helical Device showing the thin blue saddle coils that researchers used to make diagnostic measurements with the new computer code. (Click to view larger version...)
A simulated plasma in the Large Helical Device showing the thin blue saddle coils that researchers used to make diagnostic measurements with the new computer code.
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan have developed a rapid method for meeting a key challenge for fusion science. The challenge has been to simulate the diagnostic measurement of plasmas produced by twisting, or 3D, magnetic fields in fusion facilities. While such fields characterize facilities called stellarators, otherwise symmetric, or 2D, facilities such as tokamaks also can benefit from 3D fields.

Researchers led by PPPL physicist Sam Lazerson have now created a computer code that simulates the required diagnostics, and have validated the code on the Large Helical Device stellarator in Japan. Called "Diagno v2.0," the new program utilizes information from previous codes that simulate 3D plasmas without the diagnostic measurements. The addition of this new capability could, with further refinement, enable physicists to predict the outcome of 3D plasma experiments with a high degree of accuracy.

Read more here.


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