Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • In-vessel electrical systems | What it takes to wire up a fusion reactor

    While the challenges of keeping cables operational in harsh environments such as jet engines and nuclear fission reactors have been understood for a long time, [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly preparation | Off goes the lid

    In the summer of 2017, a circular platform was installed inside of the large steel-and-concrete cylinder of the Tokamak pit. The 200-tonne structure was meant t [...]

    Read more

  • Deliveries | Two coils on their way

    For the past five years, 'highly exceptional loads' (HEL) have been successfully travelling along the ITER Itinerary to be delivered to the ITER site. As the pr [...]

    Read more

  • ITER NOW video | Ready for the big lifts

    This new video in our "ITER NOW" series provides an insider's view of the recent load tests performed as the ITER Organization prepares for the machin [...]

    Read more

  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

    It has been likened to the filter of a swimming pool or an oversized ashtray. It has been called alien in shape and hellish in its affinity for heat. But whatev [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Adjusting the roundabouts will shorten the journey



Adjustments are underway currently on the ITER Itinerary, in advance of the test convoys planned for September (dimensions) and October (logistics and organization) 2013.

Since mid-April, work has been carried out under the direction of the French administration and the Bouches-du-Rhône department Council  (Conseil général) to flatten roundabouts and adapt the dividers between roads to the requirements of the future ITER loads.

Combined with the use of new, more advanced transport platform, the on-going works will contribute to bring down to two or three nights the duration of the journey—as compared to the five nights that were originally anticipated.

The ITER Itinerary is 104 kilometres of specially adapted road for the passage of the ITER convoys from their landing point on the Mediterranean to the ITER site in Saint Paul-lez-Durance. The heaviest of these loads (transport vehicle included) will weigh nearly 900 tonnes. Other load characteristics are impressive as well: the longest load will measure over 40 metres; the widest, 9 metres, and the highest, 11 metres.


return to the latest published articles