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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Summer postcards from the ITER worksite

    The latest harvest of ITER construction photos may be taken from the same point—the tallest crane on site—but there is always an abundance of new detail to be g [...]

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  • The ring fortress

    ITER'ssteel-and-concretebioshield has become the definingfeature of Tokamak Complex construction. Twolevels only remain to be poured (out of six). It is a 'rin [...]

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  • The wave factory

    A year ago, work was just beginning on the steel reinforcement for the building's foundation slab. The Radio Frequency Heating Building is now nearing the last [...]

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  • It's all happening inside

    Since the giant poster was added to the Assembly Hall's completed exterior in June 2016 the building has lookedfrom afar like a finished project. Butinside, tea [...]

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  • Along skid row

    They look like perfectly aligned emergency housing units. But of course they're not: the 18 concrete structures in the ITER cryoplant are massive pads that will [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Adding fuel to MAST's fire

-Culham Centre for Fusion Energy

Firing tiny deuterium pellets into the tokamak furnace is one of the most effective ways of getting fuel into the plasma, enabling fusion reactions and the unlocking of energy. (Click to view larger version...)
Firing tiny deuterium pellets into the tokamak furnace is one of the most effective ways of getting fuel into the plasma, enabling fusion reactions and the unlocking of energy.
They call it the "snowball in hell"—a bullet of frozen deuterium fuel heading at high speed into the furnace-like plasma of the MAST fusion device at Culham. A team at MAST is investigating this method of fuelling plasmas and how it will work in the future on the giant international experiment ITER.

Firing these tiny pellets is one of the most effective ways of getting fuel into the plasma, enabling fusion reactions and the unlocking of energy. This will become increasingly important as future fusion devices become bigger and plasmas get hotter to reach ignition, the point at which the plasma heats itself without external input—crucial for power-producing reactors. To achieve ignition, the density of the plasma core must be raised and sustained by fuelling it.

Luca Garzotti, one of the CCFE physicists studying pellet injection on MAST, explains the process: "Just like a car engine, a tokamak needs to be fuelled—the fuel goes in to the plasma and there is an exhaust to get rid of unwanted gases. In fusion, helium comes out of the exhaust via a system called the divertor. I'm looking at how we can put the fuel (deuterium and tritium) in at the start.

Read more on Culham Centre for Fusion Energy website.


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