Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Open Doors Day | An intense and unforgettable experience

    Saturday was Jacques's birthday. At age 90, the long-retired engineer from Aix-en-Provence had only one item on his wish list: to visit ITER for a third time an [...]

    Read more

  • Power conversion | A potent illustration of the "One ITER" spirit

    Europe made the buildings; the piping came from India; China and Korea provided the transformers; Russia manufactured the massive 'busbar' network. The ITER Org [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Upgrade completed on DIII-D tokamak

    The DIII-D National Fusion Program (US) has completed a series of important enhancements to its fusion facility, providing researchers with several first-of-a-k [...]

    Read more

  • Vacuum lab | Ensuring leak test sensitivity

    A helium leak test is one of several factory acceptance tests planned for the sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel before they are shipped to ITER. In a vacuum lab [...]

    Read more

  • Bookmark | The Future of Fusion Energy

    To write about fusion is to walk a fine line between the temptation of lyricism and the arid demands of scientific accuracy. Whereas the general media tends to [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

A jewel in its concrete box

R.A.

Deep into the ITER servers lays the huge data bank, constantly updated, that forms the 3D blueprint of the whole installation. Digging into this "detailed model", one can create ultra-precise renditions of any part of the machine, systems or buildings — down to the smallest pipe, nut and bolt.

Not everybody, however, needs such a high level of details. A designer working on, say, in-wall shielding or assembly tooling, needs to have a clear picture of the environment his components will fit in — but not necessarily with the resolution the "detailed model" can provide.

The ''simplified models'' that Lauris Honoré creates from the huge ITER data bank are terrific pedagogical and communication tools, revealing what the installation is really like, in all its beauty and complexity. (Click to view larger version...)
The ''simplified models'' that Lauris Honoré creates from the huge ITER data bank are terrific pedagogical and communication tools, revealing what the installation is really like, in all its beauty and complexity.
What he needs is 3D data that is sufficiently detailed but light enough to be handled by his workstation. What he needs is something simplified. And Lauris Honoré, a young designer who's been with ITER for six years already, is here to provide it.

Simplified models have a value that reaches well beyond the technical needs of ITER. They are terrific pedagogical and communication tools, revealing what the installation is really like, in all its beauty and complexity.

Lauris has developed a talent for these spectacular, colourful renditions. "I add texture, colours, brilliance, put a little man here and there to give a sense of scale... the drawing must be both technically impeccable and visually pleasing."

The Tokamak Complex rendition that we publish today (a much reduced version of the original) is a perfect illustration of this approach: here's the heart of the installation, densely packed with systems and devices — a fabulous machine and encased in concrete like a jewel in its box.


return to the latest published articles