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Latest ITER Newsline

  • CODAC | The "invisible system" that makes all things possible

    It is easy to spot all the big equipment going into ITER; what is not so visible is the underlying software that makes the equipment come alive. Local control [...]

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  • Assembly | Zero-gravity in a cramped place

    The volume of the Tokamak pit may be huge, but so are the components that need to be installed. As a result, assembly operators will have very little room to ma [...]

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  • Image of the week | A closer look at KSTAR

    Over its twelve years of operation, the KSTAR tokamak (for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has built an extremely valuable database for the fut [...]

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  • Pre-compression rings | Six of nine completed

    The European Domestic Agency is responsible for the fabrication of nine pre-compression rings (three top, three bottom and three spare). The first five have bee [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Japan completes the first D-shaped coil of the ITER Tokamak

    In a ceremony on 30 January, a major industrial achievement was celebrated in Japan—the completion of the first 360-tonne D-shaped toroidal field coil for the I [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

The superconducting connection

Sabina Griffith

Leader of the Magnet and Superconductor Group at CERN during the construction of the Large Hadron Collider, Professor Rossi is now charged with the particle collider's High Luminosity Upgrade, a project that he described to the ITER community on Tuesday, 24 June. (Click to view larger version...)
Leader of the Magnet and Superconductor Group at CERN during the construction of the Large Hadron Collider, Professor Rossi is now charged with the particle collider's High Luminosity Upgrade, a project that he described to the ITER community on Tuesday, 24 June.
They have a lot in common: they are huge, they are powerful and they are superconducting. The blue dipoles that drive CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the magnets under construction for ITER share many superlatives.

For this reason, the two international organizations signed a Cooperation Agreement in March 2008 that provides for cooperation in the design and manufacturing of superconducting magnets and associated technologies. CERN has also become the reference laboratory for the testing of ITER's superconducting strands.

Since its implementation in 2009 the collaboration has proven to be an outstanding example of high technology problem solving, with major inputs to the ITER magnets in the areas of superconductors, HTS current leads and high voltage testing.

On 24 June, the CERN-ITER collaboration steering committee came together at ITER Headquarters for its annual meeting, with CERN physicist Lucio Rossi presiding for the last time. He'll be handing the baton to colleague Miguel Jimenez, head of the Technology Department at CERN, in order to concentrate on his new assignment: the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade.

Professor Rossi presented the LHC upgrade project to the ITER community in a seminar titled "LHC: From construction to upgrade."



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