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Of Interest

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Under the slab

From left to right: Steve Meador, David Moncton, Laurent Schmieder (European Domestic Agency, F4E), Mike Knotek, Jay Marx, John Glowienka and Tim Watson (ITER). (Click to view larger version...)
From left to right: Steve Meador, David Moncton, Laurent Schmieder (European Domestic Agency, F4E), Mike Knotek, Jay Marx, John Glowienka and Tim Watson (ITER).
On Tuesday 9 October, a small group from the United States led by Michael Knotek of the US Department of Energy was treated to a worksite tour with an unusual twist: the opportunity to visit the "basement" of the Tokamak Complex.

Underneath the Tokamak Complex slab are the 493 pillars and anti-seismic bearings that will support the weight of the Tokamak Complex (400,000 metric tons) and absorb ground motion in the case of a seismic event.

With 1.9 metres between the lower concrete slab and the upper (B2) slab, there is room enough for most visitors to walk around comfortably. But not US group member David Moncton. At 1.93 m (6"4'), plus safety helmet, he was too tall to stand fully upright ...



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