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Of Interest

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Three giants take position on the platform

Giants... Three of the five cranes planned for Tokamak Complex construction activities will rise over 75 metres (76 m, 80 m and 82 m) and have lifting capacities of 6-8 tonnes at the tip of their 55- to 65-metre-long booms.

Three of the five cranes planned for Tokamak Complex construction activities will rise over 75 metres (76 m, 80 m and 82 m) and have lifting capacities of 6-8 tonnes at the tip of their 55- to 65-metre-long booms. (Click to view larger version...)
Three of the five cranes planned for Tokamak Complex construction activities will rise over 75 metres (76 m, 80 m and 82 m) and have lifting capacities of 6-8 tonnes at the tip of their 55- to 65-metre-long booms.
The giants will not be alone. As wall erection is due to begin before the end of this month, two other cranes ranging in height from 55 to 63 metres "under the hook," are in various stages of assembly. One, the central crane (52 metres high), will be anchored right in the middle of the Tokamak Complex basemat slab. Equipped with a shorter boom (35 metres), it will handle loads of up to 9 tonnes.

Whereas laying rebar for the construction of the basemat slab required a lifting capacity of 1.5 to 2 tonnes, the construction activities planned in the Tokamak Pit will require stronger "workhorses," as heavy prefabricated elements and five-metre pieces of formwork will be handled.

As assembly work was progressing on the two large cranes closest to ITER Headquarters, anchorage for the the central crane (52 metres high) was visible on this picture of the Tokamak Complex basemat slab. Equipped with a 35-metre boom, the central crane will handle loads of up to 9 tonnes. (Click to view larger version...)
As assembly work was progressing on the two large cranes closest to ITER Headquarters, anchorage for the the central crane (52 metres high) was visible on this picture of the Tokamak Complex basemat slab. Equipped with a 35-metre boom, the central crane will handle loads of up to 9 tonnes.
Operating in a relatively restricted area, the Tokamak Complex cranes will be guided by sophisticated interference software that will coordinate their movements and ensure the safety of the handling operations.

The two large cranes closest to ITER Headquarters have now reached their final height. Where it takes one week to assemble a standard 45-metre crane, it will have taken four to raise these monsters to their full stature.


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