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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

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Euronews focuses on ITER

The Euronews documentary on ITER aired in 14 different languages on 29 April. (Click to view larger version...)
The Euronews documentary on ITER aired in 14 different languages on 29 April.
Is fusion the answer to our planet's energy needs? This is the question asked in the five-minute Euronews documentary filmed last week at ITER and which aired on Wednesday 29 April in 14 different languages.

ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot says "yes" and gives three reasons.

First—the availability of fusion fuels. "With hydrogen," he says, "we have a source of fuel for millions of years to come."

The second reason is that, although radioactive waste is produced by the fusion process, "the lifespan of the waste is very short—just a few hundred years, compared to millions of years in the case of fission."

And third, fusion is intrinsically safe. Even in the improbable event of an accident, the Director-General explains in the documentary, "the quantity [of radioelements] released into the environment would allow the population living around the reactor to stay where they are and resume their activities."

As for the cost of the ITER project, it must be viewed in relation to "the quantity or energy that will be produced" once fusion becomes an industrial and commercial reality.

And that, says Director-General Bigot, "justifies the initial investment."

View the five-minute documentary on the Euronews website in English, French, or 12 other languages.


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