Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Computer-Aided Design | A new platform with Australia

    In September 2016, the signature of a Cooperation Agreement between the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the ITER Organization [...]

    Read more

  • Ten years later | A prodigious adventure

    ITER began its existence as an aspiration in the early 1980s, as actors in the fusion community called for the joint machine that would demonstrate the feasibil [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | An impromptu visit

    Afteraddressing the UN Climate Change Conference on 15 November, French President Emmanuel Macron toured thecolourful COP23 exhibition zone. It was towards the [...]

    Read more

  • Cryoplant | How to install a compressor

    In order to properly install a helium compressor skid on its concrete pad, you need to start with a large push broom to sweep away the dust that inevitably accu [...]

    Read more

  • Magnetic system | Nine rings to fight the force

    Work on the pre-compression ringsof the ITER magnet system progresses in Europe, where work on a full-scale prototype is underway. These technically challenging [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

New use for old tires

Robert Arnoux

Ten to twenty-five millimetres thick and the size of a two euro coin, the tire pellets are used as filler material for underground storm basins. (Click to view larger version...)
Ten to twenty-five millimetres thick and the size of a two euro coin, the tire pellets are used as filler material for underground storm basins.
Every year, several hundred thousand tons of used tires are discarded. Most end up in landfills—only a fraction is granted a second life as re-treads, filler-material, "crumb rubber" for asphalt, fuel, artificial reefs or ... flower pots.

Hilios, a small family business in Beaucaire, a village north of Arles, has devised and patented a process that transforms used tires into pellets. Ten to twenty-five millimetres thick and the size of a two euro coin, the tire pellets are used as filler material for underground storm basins.

This brand new technique was recently adopted for the creation of two large storm basins at the International School in Manosque. "A volume filled with tire pellets," explains Dimitri Papacristou, the inventor of the process, "has a much higher retention capacity than one that is filled with stone pebbles, as storms basins habitually are."

Some 550 cubic metres of tire pellets and also tire flanks ''slices'' were arranged in layers and covered with dirt to create the International School's storm basins. © Jean-Pierre TISSIER, La Provence (Click to view larger version...)
Some 550 cubic metres of tire pellets and also tire flanks ''slices'' were arranged in layers and covered with dirt to create the International School's storm basins. © Jean-Pierre TISSIER, La Provence
The 550 cubic metres of tire pellets that went into the International School's storm basins will retain some 380 cubic metres of water ... enough to safely weather the exceptional storm that happens theoretically once every one hundred years.

Tire pellets are also four times lighter than pebbles, thus requiring considerably fewer truck rotations to fill the basins. The advantages of the technique developed by Mr. Papacristou do not stop there. "Compared to pebbles," he explains, "tire pellets offer better resistance to rolling—you could build a highway above these storm basins!"

Fortunately, no highway will be built over the International School storm basins. The area over one will be developed as a sports field, and over the other as a "green area."



return to the latest published articles