Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Art and ITER | Two sisters, two suns and a monument to fusion

    Amid the gentle slopes of Asciano, Italy, there stands a stone window that frames the Sun on the summer solstice. It looks as though it might have always been t [...]

    Read more

  • Staff | The men and women of ITER

    They hail from Ahmedabad and Prague ... from Naka and Moscow ... from Seoul, Hefei, Atlanta and hundreds of other towns and cities across the 35 nations partici [...]

    Read more

  • ITER Talks | All about ITER and fusion

    Beginning this autumn, the ITER Organization will be launching a new video series to inform, inspire and educate. The first video—introducing the series and off [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | A majestic components enters the stage

    The floor of the Assembly Hall is an ever-changing stage. Like characters in a grand production, components of all size and shapes make a spectacular entry, pl [...]

    Read more

  • Magnet system | A set of spares for the long journey

    In about five years, ITER will embark on a long journey through largely uncharted territory. Conditions will be harsh and—despite all the calculations, modellin [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Controlling ITER with fuellers, ticklers, and terminators

The inside of a pellet selector, which directs pellets to different outputs in a fusion reactor. Photo: ORNL (Click to view larger version...)
The inside of a pellet selector, which directs pellets to different outputs in a fusion reactor. Photo: ORNL
When it's up and running, the ITER fusion reactor will be very big and very hot, with more than 800 m³ of hydrogen plasma reaching 170 million °C. The systems that fuel and control it, on the other hand, will be small and very cold.
 
Pellets of frozen gas will be shot into the plasma—some to keep it fuelled, some to manage plasma activity, and some to extinguish the plasma as needed.
 
The idea of using frozen pellets to fuel a magnetic fusion reactor is not new. Researchers with the Fusion Materials and Nuclear Systems Division at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have been working on the technology for 35 years. Their handiwork helps run fusion experiments across the world, including America's largest fusion reactor, the DIII-D tokamak operated by General Atomics in San Diego, California.
 
Their expertise also made them the right choice to take on the much more challenging job of controlling ITER, which is more than eight times larger than the largest fusion reactor now in existence.
 
"The pellets are much more efficient at fuelling the fusion plasma because they can penetrate fairly deep into the hot plasma before being ablated and ionized into additional plasma," explained Larry Baylor of ORNL's Plasma Technology and Applications Group.
 
"The alternative method of injecting gas that is primarily used in today's smaller devices will not add fuel efficiently in ITER because of its large size and high magnetic field."
 
Baylor said his group is working on three types of pellet, which he refers to as fuellers, ticklers, and terminators.
 
Continue reading the article on the ORNL website.


return to the latest published articles