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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

It's a bird...it's a plate...



All kinds of equipment—magnet feeders, cooling water system tanks, diagnostic systems, cryolines, cable trays—need to be attached to the walls, floors and ceilings of the Tokamak Complex.

But for structural reasons, as well as for nuclear confinement, you can't drill holes to attach pegs, hooks or shelves in a nuclear building.

The solution comes in the form of embedded plates that are welded deep into the rebar lattice and are capable of supporting loads of up to 90 metric tons in pure traction (for the largest of them).

All in all, 80,000 embedded plates are planned in the Tokamak Complex. In some cases, they can be pre-installed in the reinforcement "cages" and welded with utmost precision once the cage is in its final position on the building site.

This picture captures the spectacular "flight" of a reinforcement cage as it is lifted from the prefabrication area to be delivered to the workers responsible for the Tritium Building area, on the northeast side of the Tokamak Complex.


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