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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

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  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

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  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

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  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

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  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

It's a bird...it's a plate...



All kinds of equipment—magnet feeders, cooling water system tanks, diagnostic systems, cryolines, cable trays—need to be attached to the walls, floors and ceilings of the Tokamak Complex.

But for structural reasons, as well as for nuclear confinement, you can't drill holes to attach pegs, hooks or shelves in a nuclear building.

The solution comes in the form of embedded plates that are welded deep into the rebar lattice and are capable of supporting loads of up to 90 metric tons in pure traction (for the largest of them).

All in all, 80,000 embedded plates are planned in the Tokamak Complex. In some cases, they can be pre-installed in the reinforcement "cages" and welded with utmost precision once the cage is in its final position on the building site.

This picture captures the spectacular "flight" of a reinforcement cage as it is lifted from the prefabrication area to be delivered to the workers responsible for the Tritium Building area, on the northeast side of the Tokamak Complex.


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