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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite | A frontier town at the frontier of science

    Like a frontier town of the American West, the ITER site grew from nothing to a thriving community of several thousand people in less than one decade. The origi [...]

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  • EPICS | An arena for cooperation

    Like the system of nerves in the human body, ITER's control system will connect the ITER 'brain' (control room systems) to its eyes and ears (sensors and diagno [...]

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  • 8th ITER Robots | 49 teams from 29 schools

    Upon entering the gymnasium at the Lycée des Iscles, you can feel the energy. Seven hundred students, pulsating music, sounds of triumph (and disappointment). T [...]

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  • Image of the week | Comfy cocoon

    The protective cocoon that encases the cryostat's lower cylinder briefly acquired some curves, last week, as air was pumped into it to test for potential leaks. [...]

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  • On site | New building, two purposes

    Excavation has started for a concrete building designed for the distinct storage and handling requirements of ITER's beryllium components—in particular, the fir [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

It's a bird...it's a plate...



All kinds of equipment—magnet feeders, cooling water system tanks, diagnostic systems, cryolines, cable trays—need to be attached to the walls, floors and ceilings of the Tokamak Complex.

But for structural reasons, as well as for nuclear confinement, you can't drill holes to attach pegs, hooks or shelves in a nuclear building.

The solution comes in the form of embedded plates that are welded deep into the rebar lattice and are capable of supporting loads of up to 90 metric tons in pure traction (for the largest of them).

All in all, 80,000 embedded plates are planned in the Tokamak Complex. In some cases, they can be pre-installed in the reinforcement "cages" and welded with utmost precision once the cage is in its final position on the building site.

This picture captures the spectacular "flight" of a reinforcement cage as it is lifted from the prefabrication area to be delivered to the workers responsible for the Tritium Building area, on the northeast side of the Tokamak Complex.


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