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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryoplant | Filled from floor to ceiling

    The ITER cryoplant used to be a vast echoey chamber with 5,400 m² of interior space divided into two areas; now, it is filled from floor to ceiling with industr [...]

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  • Cryostat | Adjusting, welding, testing ...

    The assembly of the ITER cryostat—the stainless steel "thermos" that insulates the ultra-cold superconducting magnets from the environment—is progress [...]

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  • Tokamak Building | Full steam ahead

    In this central arena of the construction site, construction teams are active three shifts a day—two full work shifts and a third, at night, dedicated to moving [...]

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  • Poloidal field coils | Turning tables and hot resin

    One of only two manufacturing facilities located on the ITER site, the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility was constructed by Europe to house the winding, imp [...]

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  • Assembly Hall | One giant standing

    Two identical handling tools in the Assembly Hall will play a critical role in preparing ITER's nine vacuum vessel sectors for their final journey: transport by [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

It's a bird...it's a plate...



All kinds of equipment—magnet feeders, cooling water system tanks, diagnostic systems, cryolines, cable trays—need to be attached to the walls, floors and ceilings of the Tokamak Complex.

But for structural reasons, as well as for nuclear confinement, you can't drill holes to attach pegs, hooks or shelves in a nuclear building.

The solution comes in the form of embedded plates that are welded deep into the rebar lattice and are capable of supporting loads of up to 90 metric tons in pure traction (for the largest of them).

All in all, 80,000 embedded plates are planned in the Tokamak Complex. In some cases, they can be pre-installed in the reinforcement "cages" and welded with utmost precision once the cage is in its final position on the building site.

This picture captures the spectacular "flight" of a reinforcement cage as it is lifted from the prefabrication area to be delivered to the workers responsible for the Tritium Building area, on the northeast side of the Tokamak Complex.


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