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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Bookmark | The Future of Fusion Energy

    To write about fusion is to walk a fine line between the temptation of lyricism and the arid demands of scientific accuracy. Whereas the general media tends to [...]

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  • Image of the week |The shine of silver

    All ITER components are precious. But some look more precious than others. A vacuum vessel sector, a toroidal field coil, a cryopump, or a divertor cassette a [...]

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  • JT-60SA | "ITER satellite" to begin operating next year

    In a major assembly milestone for the JT-60SA tokamak, the 12-metre-tall central solenoid was successfully installed by overhead crane on 8 May. Japanese televi [...]

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  • ITER physics school | Ten years of lectures now available

    The lectures from ten ITER International Schools held since 2007 have been collected and are now available through a dedicated webpage on the ITER website. I [...]

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  • "Vigyan Samagam" | India showcases megascience

    From micro to macro—specifically, from the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) that will study neutrino mass ordering events lasting 10-43 seconds, to the La [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

A newcomer in the crèche



A newcomer has joined the traditional figures of the Provençal nativity scene (the crèche) that families, churches and municipalities set up in the weeks before Christmas.

The newcomer wears a white lab coat and ponders complex equations on a blackboard — he's a scientist working for ITER, as evidenced by the badge hanging from his neck.

For the moment, the clay figure (santon) of the ITER scientist is only visible in the lobby of ITER Headquarters. Just like in the tree-lighting ceremony that was held on 9 December, he is standing next to the village mayor. (The mayor of Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance gifts a large Christmas tree every year to the ITER Organization.)

But as ITER roots dig deeper and deeper into the soil of Provence, the clay figure of the ITER scientist will become as familiar — and as legitimate — as the fisherman, the miller, the scissor grinder and all the figures that reflect daily life in the towns and villages of Provence.



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