Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

    Read more

  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

    Read more

  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

    Read more

  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

    Read more

  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

ITER components take their maiden voyage

Masayuki Oshikiri

The first conductor unit lengths took to sea on 16 March ... (Click to view larger version...)
The first conductor unit lengths took to sea on 16 March ...
The first copper and superconducting conductor unit lengths produced under a toroidal field conductor Procurement Arrangement took to the sea last month in Japan.

The three large components were manufactured by Nippon Steel Engineering at the Wakamatsu ITER factory, in the southernmost Japanese island of Kyushu. They are the first components produced under a Procurement Arrangement signed with Japan in November 2007. The copper dummy conductors are respectively 100 and 760 metres long; the niobium-tin superconductor is 415 metres long.

... and arrived three days later in Yokohama. (Click to view larger version...)
... and arrived three days later in Yokohama.
Loaded aboard a chartered cargo boat, the components left the Nippon Steel facility on 16 March, crossed though Seto Inland Sea and into the Pacific Ocean, and arrived at Yokohama on 19 March.

The copper dummy conductors are respectively 100 and 760 metres long; the niobium-tin superconductor is 415 metres long. (Click to view larger version...)
The copper dummy conductors are respectively 100 and 760 metres long; the niobium-tin superconductor is 415 metres long.
There, they will remain in storage in a Toshiba Corporation facility until receiving hold point clearance from the ITER Organization.

Once the acceptance procedure is complete, trial winding will be performed on toroidal field coil mockups at the Toshiba facility. JAEA and the ITER Organization will supervise these operations that are part of "Phase II activity" as defined in the toroidal field coil Procurement Arrangements.



return to the latest published articles