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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Huge support beams — coming soon

Under contract with the European Domestic Agency, the NKMNOELL-REEL* consortium is manufacturing a pair of cranes for the ITER Assembly Building. These cranes, each with a lifting capacity of 750 metric tons, will work in tandem to transfer component loads of up to 1,500 metric tons along a continuous crane bay between the Tokamak installation area and the Assembly Building. 

One of the four 200-tonne girder beams leaves the factory in Aviles, Spain. The structural beam is 46 m long. Photo: REEL-NKM (Click to view larger version...)
One of the four 200-tonne girder beams leaves the factory in Aviles, Spain. The structural beam is 46 m long. Photo: REEL-NKM
Each crane will be supported by two giant girders that span the width of the Assembly Building. The first two of these 200-tonne components have left the factory in Spain and are waiting to be loaded at Aviles harbour in the province of Asturias. Two others will follow shortly.

Assembly is also underway on the four trolleys (two per crane) that will host 375-tonne hoists. Once all trolley activities are completed, and they have passed factory tests, they will be delivered to the ITER site in May.

The scope of the contract concluded in 2013 between the European Domestic Agency and NKMNOELL-REEL includes the design, certification, manufacturing, testing, installation and commissioning of the two heavy-lift cranes, as well as two auxiliary cranes with a lift capacity of 50 tonnes each that will be used for lighter assembly activities and the Tokamak Cargo Lift that will move casks containing components in the Tokamak Building.

The assembly cranes will be installed through the roof of the Assembly Building with the aid of a giant crawler crane.

* The NKMNOELL-REEL consortium is formed by NKMNoell Special Cranes GmbH, Germany and REEL S.A.S., France (part of Groupe REEL).

See the full story on the European Domestic Agency website.



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