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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Sitting on the bridge crane

Suppose that you're sitting on the bridge crane soon to be installed in the Assembly Hall — you are facing west and here's the panorama that you would be taking in.

Here's the panorama that you would take in if you were sitting, facing west, on the bridge crane soon to be installed in the Assembly Hall. © Fusion For Energy (Click to view larger version...)
Here's the panorama that you would take in if you were sitting, facing west, on the bridge crane soon to be installed in the Assembly Hall. © Fusion For Energy
Down on the floor to the left, what appears to be crop circles in concrete is in fact the deep anchorage plots of the giant Sector Sub-Assembly tools presently under fabrication in Korea.

On both sides of the steel structure of the building, the railings that support the beam you're sitting on run the whole length of the Assembly Hall and will later run to the far end of the Tokamak Building.

Further out is the circular pit where the ITER Tokamak will be assembled. If you perch long enough on the crane beam, you'll see the thick concrete walls of the bioshield rise, level after level, until they form a circular fortress around the Tokamak.

Unfortunately, no one will ever sit on the  bridge crane ... It's a pity, for the view is really breathtaking.


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