Gliding above the ITER site

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryodistribution | Blowing cold and hot

    If the cryodistribution system were a railroad, the cryogenic termination cold box would be its main switch. A massive structure packed with pipes, valves, elec [...]

    Read more

  • Pre-assembly activities | Captured from on high

    With assembly tools standing 22 metres tall, massive bridge cranes straddling the width of the building, and alien-shaped components placed at regular intervals [...]

    Read more

  • 27th ITER Council | Assembly moves ahead

    The Twenty-Seventh Meeting of the ITER Council took place by videoconference on 18 and 19 November 2020, chaired by LUO Delong from China. Representat [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Translating JET into ITER

    With an inner wall made of beryllium and tungsten, the European tokamak JET is the only tokamak in the world to share the same material environment as ITER. Whe [...]

    Read more

  • Worksite | Major progress you don't see from the air

    There was a time when aerial pictures of the ITER worksite taken at six-month intervals showed spectacular change. Buildings and structures sprouted from previo [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Gliding above the ITER site



Once per year Karl-Heinz Meiwes-Broer, a physics professor from Rostock University in Germany, hooks his glider up to his car and heads south towards Vinon-sur-Verdon. This village near the ITER construction site is France's gliding heaven.

From the air, at a height of 1,000 metres, the view of the ITER worksite is spectacular—the density of cranes and equipment in the Tokamak Complex area a sure indication of the intensity of ongoing work.

Large expanses of bare land still appear, but they're not devoid of activity. To the right of the photo, north of the concrete batching plant, preparatory works are under way for the cooling towers. North of the 257-metre-long coil winding facility, past the foundation works for the cryoplant, contractors are carrying out soil investigations for the Magnet Conversion Power buildings.
 
We all wish we could fly in a glider to take in the ITER site from a bird's eye view. Prof Meiwes-Broer does that frequently—but this time what he really wished for was to take a full tour of ITER from the ground. That's a wish that came true last week.


return to the latest published articles