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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Last stages of assembly for behemoth tool

    Among the dozens of specially designed tools that will have a role to play in positioning and assembling ITER's giant machine components, two stand—literally—a [...]

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  • Kazakhstan expresses interest in collaboration

    The representatives of the nuclear institutions of Kazakhstan who visited ITER last Tuesday stated it simply and clearly: they are very interested in collaborat [...]

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  • Let there be light!

    Achieving fusion energy is more of a marathon than a sprint. And so is the production of a documentary film on fusion ... although in the beginning of their end [...]

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  • Safety control electronics remain fit after furious shaking

    ITER's nuclear safety control electronics have undergone a series of tests in order to demonstrate that they can continue to perform their functions flawlessly [...]

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  • Japan completes first 110-tonne winding pack

    Japan has the procurement responsibility for 9 of ITER's 19 superconducting toroidal field winding packs and all 19 of the toroidal field coil cases. In a major [...]

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Of Interest

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Central solenoid fabrication: a photo reportage

The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015. (Click to view larger version...)
The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015.
Inside of a purpose-built facility at General Atomics in California (US), ten customized workstations for central solenoid fabrication—from winding through to final testing—have been built and are undergoing commissioning with a dummy coil. Winding was completed in April on the first 14-layer production module.
 
The ITER central solenoid is the giant electromagnet at the centre of the ITER machine that will generate most of the magnetic flux charge of the plasma, initiating the initial plasma current and contributing to its maintenance. Six individual coil modules will be stacked vertically within a "cage" of supporting structures. General Atomics will also produce a seventh module as a spare.

As part of its in-kind contributions to ITER, the US is responsible for 100 percent of the central solenoid magnet, including design, R&D, module fabrication from conductor supplied by Japan, associated structure, assembly tooling, bus extensions, and cooling connections.

In the photo gallery below, follow the mock coil through the manufacturing workstations, and view the latest pictures of module 1 winding and magnet structure fabrication.

All photos courtesy of General Atomics unless otherwise indicated.


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