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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A wide angle on progress

    Whether captured from the top of a crane or from a drone hovering at an altitude of a few dozen metres, the ITER site isalways spectacular. After almost seven y [...]

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  • Inside the arena

    A visit to the deep "well" where the ITER Tokamak assembly will begin next year begins with a journey underground ... through a maze of giant pillars, [...]

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  • 10,000 tonnes of magnets to cool

    In ITER, huge volumesof liquid helium will be circulated throughout a complex, five-kilometre network of pipes, pumps and valves to keep the 10,000-tonne magnet [...]

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  • Heaviest convoy yet

    The triple convoy that reached ITER on Thursday 13 April wasthe heaviest ever organized since the beginning of "highly exceptional" deliveries in Janu [...]

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  • Gouging the giant's eye

    On the side of the ITER bioshield that faces the main ITER office building, four large openings have been preserved to allow passage for the neutral beam inject [...]

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Of Interest

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Central solenoid fabrication: a photo reportage

The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015. (Click to view larger version...)
The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015.
Inside of a purpose-built facility at General Atomics in California (US), ten customized workstations for central solenoid fabrication—from winding through to final testing—have been built and are undergoing commissioning with a dummy coil. Winding was completed in April on the first 14-layer production module.
 
The ITER central solenoid is the giant electromagnet at the centre of the ITER machine that will generate most of the magnetic flux charge of the plasma, initiating the initial plasma current and contributing to its maintenance. Six individual coil modules will be stacked vertically within a "cage" of supporting structures. General Atomics will also produce a seventh module as a spare.

As part of its in-kind contributions to ITER, the US is responsible for 100 percent of the central solenoid magnet, including design, R&D, module fabrication from conductor supplied by Japan, associated structure, assembly tooling, bus extensions, and cooling connections.

In the photo gallery below, follow the mock coil through the manufacturing workstations, and view the latest pictures of module 1 winding and magnet structure fabrication.

All photos courtesy of General Atomics unless otherwise indicated.


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