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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Fusion Doctors | ITER hosts the future

    For three days last week, the ITER building was brimming with energy, inspiration and enthusiasm. One hundred and thirty-five young fusion aficionados took over [...]

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  • Fusion world | What's next for the stellarator?

    Earlier this year, the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator fusion project reported record achievements from its most recent experimental campaign. Newsline spoke with t [...]

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  • Metrology and the ITER machine | Perfectly planned points

    Inside of the Tokamak Complex, a network of 2,000 small 'fiducial target nests' will provide the reference datum for the dimensional control and alignment of ma [...]

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  • Breaking news | First component installed next week

    In the third week of November, the ITER Organization will be installing the first component of the machine in the basement of the Tokamak Building. The 10-met [...]

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  • Newsline 500 | A community newspaper

    Twelve years ago, men and women from three continents began gathering in a set of prefabricated offices within the premises of CEA Cadarache, one of France's ma [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Central solenoid fabrication: a photo reportage

The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015. (Click to view larger version...)
The General Atomics work floor in Poway, California, during the installation of the central solenoid workstations in 2015.
Inside of a purpose-built facility at General Atomics in California (US), ten customized workstations for central solenoid fabrication—from winding through to final testing—have been built and are undergoing commissioning with a dummy coil. Winding was completed in April on the first 14-layer production module.
 
The ITER central solenoid is the giant electromagnet at the centre of the ITER machine that will generate most of the magnetic flux charge of the plasma, initiating the initial plasma current and contributing to its maintenance. Six individual coil modules will be stacked vertically within a "cage" of supporting structures. General Atomics will also produce a seventh module as a spare.

As part of its in-kind contributions to ITER, the US is responsible for 100 percent of the central solenoid magnet, including design, R&D, module fabrication from conductor supplied by Japan, associated structure, assembly tooling, bus extensions, and cooling connections.

In the photo gallery below, follow the mock coil through the manufacturing workstations, and view the latest pictures of module 1 winding and magnet structure fabrication.

All photos courtesy of General Atomics unless otherwise indicated.


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