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Latest ITER Newsline

  • 23rd ITER Council | Pace and performance on track

    Working as an integrated team, the ITER Organization and seven Domestic Agencies are continuing to meet the project's demanding schedule to First Plasma in 2025 [...]

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  • Fusion Doctors | ITER hosts the future

    For three days last week, the ITER building was brimming with energy, inspiration and enthusiasm. One hundred and thirty-five young fusion aficionados took over [...]

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  • Fusion world | What's next for the stellarator?

    Earlier this year, the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator fusion project reported record achievements from its most recent experimental campaign. Newsline spoke with t [...]

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  • Metrology and the ITER machine | Perfectly planned points

    Inside of the Tokamak Complex, a network of 2,000 small 'fiducial target nests' will provide the reference datum for the dimensional control and alignment of ma [...]

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  • Breaking news | First component installed next week

    In the third week of November, the ITER Organization will be installing the first component of the machine in the basement of the Tokamak Building. The 10-met [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

A complex landscape of concrete and steel

The more construction progresses on the ITER worksite, the more the complexity of the project becomes obvious—and striking.

 (Click to view larger version...)
What was happening in the Tokamak Pit used to be easy to understand: a large hole in the bedrock, support columns and antiseismic pads, steel reinforcement and concrete to create the massive foundations of the ITER Tokamak.

Now—except at the very centre of the Tokamak Complex worksite where the middle crane stands—the foundations are no longer visible and construction has already advanced to the second basement level (B1).

The B1-level slab has been completed for the Diagnostic Building (right), is half completed for the Tokamak Building, and—on the site of the Tritium Building at left—workers are busy laying steel rebar prior to concrete pouring.

Aerial pictures like this one, taken on 11 July, reveal a complex landscape of concrete and steel and show the extraordinary density of embedded plates welded into the rebar.

The simple geometric forms of yesteryear have been replaced by complex structures but the magic remains—the ITER worksite is still a fascinating place.

View a selection of aerial photos below.



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