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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Rendezvous | D and T to meet at JET in 2020

    In 2020, for the first time in more than 20 years, a reaction that only occurs in the core of the stars will be produced on Earth in a man-made machine. In the [...]

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  • On site | MOMENTUM believes in recent graduates

    It is rare for students to leave university and immediately begin work on a globally significant project. But thanks to the graduate program run by the project' [...]

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  • Tokamak Pit | Big steel elbow in place

    A cryostat feedthrough delivered by the Chinese Domestic Agency has become the first metal component of the machine to be installed in the Tokamak Pit, in an op [...]

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  • Neutral beam source | Europe awards EUR 20 million contract

    The contract, awarded to ALSYOM-SEIV (ALCEN group, France), launches the manufacturing phase for the beam source that will come on line in 2022 as part of the f [...]

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  • Image of the week | US Under Secretary of Science tours site

    Five months, almost to the day, after the US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry visited ITER, his deputy, Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar, stood by the same [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

A complex landscape of concrete and steel

The more construction progresses on the ITER worksite, the more the complexity of the project becomes obvious—and striking.

 (Click to view larger version...)
What was happening in the Tokamak Pit used to be easy to understand: a large hole in the bedrock, support columns and antiseismic pads, steel reinforcement and concrete to create the massive foundations of the ITER Tokamak.

Now—except at the very centre of the Tokamak Complex worksite where the middle crane stands—the foundations are no longer visible and construction has already advanced to the second basement level (B1).

The B1-level slab has been completed for the Diagnostic Building (right), is half completed for the Tokamak Building, and—on the site of the Tritium Building at left—workers are busy laying steel rebar prior to concrete pouring.

Aerial pictures like this one, taken on 11 July, reveal a complex landscape of concrete and steel and show the extraordinary density of embedded plates welded into the rebar.

The simple geometric forms of yesteryear have been replaced by complex structures but the magic remains—the ITER worksite is still a fascinating place.

View a selection of aerial photos below.



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