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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

A complex landscape of concrete and steel

The more construction progresses on the ITER worksite, the more the complexity of the project becomes obvious—and striking.

 (Click to view larger version...)
What was happening in the Tokamak Pit used to be easy to understand: a large hole in the bedrock, support columns and antiseismic pads, steel reinforcement and concrete to create the massive foundations of the ITER Tokamak.

Now—except at the very centre of the Tokamak Complex worksite where the middle crane stands—the foundations are no longer visible and construction has already advanced to the second basement level (B1).

The B1-level slab has been completed for the Diagnostic Building (right), is half completed for the Tokamak Building, and—on the site of the Tritium Building at left—workers are busy laying steel rebar prior to concrete pouring.

Aerial pictures like this one, taken on 11 July, reveal a complex landscape of concrete and steel and show the extraordinary density of embedded plates welded into the rebar.

The simple geometric forms of yesteryear have been replaced by complex structures but the magic remains—the ITER worksite is still a fascinating place.

View a selection of aerial photos below.



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