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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The making of a ring coil—a photo story

    From one end to the other of the on-site manufacturing facility for poloidal field coils, the different production stations are now clearly delimited, with tool [...]

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  • An unexpected fusion spinoff: aircraft carrier catapult

    The US company General Atomics is fabricating the 'beating heart of ITER,' an electromagnet called the central solenoid that is so large and powerful, that its [...]

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  • First steps towards "energizing"

    It takes more than the flipping of a switch to connect the ITER site to the French national grid. The operation, called a 'first energizing,' is a complex, step [...]

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  • The bioshield rises

    The bioshield structure is rising at the heart of the Tokamak Building. The last plot of the B1 level was poured last week; about half of the first ground level [...]

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  • Barcelona Supercomputer Center and ITER strengthen ties

    In a Memorandum of Understanding signed on 12 January 2017, the ITER Organization and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) in Spain have agreed 'to promote [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

A complex landscape of concrete and steel

The more construction progresses on the ITER worksite, the more the complexity of the project becomes obvious—and striking.

 (Click to view larger version...)
What was happening in the Tokamak Pit used to be easy to understand: a large hole in the bedrock, support columns and antiseismic pads, steel reinforcement and concrete to create the massive foundations of the ITER Tokamak.

Now—except at the very centre of the Tokamak Complex worksite where the middle crane stands—the foundations are no longer visible and construction has already advanced to the second basement level (B1).

The B1-level slab has been completed for the Diagnostic Building (right), is half completed for the Tokamak Building, and—on the site of the Tritium Building at left—workers are busy laying steel rebar prior to concrete pouring.

Aerial pictures like this one, taken on 11 July, reveal a complex landscape of concrete and steel and show the extraordinary density of embedded plates welded into the rebar.

The simple geometric forms of yesteryear have been replaced by complex structures but the magic remains—the ITER worksite is still a fascinating place.

View a selection of aerial photos below.



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