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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

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Four days to build a tokamak!

Julie Marcillat

Taishi Sugiyama (left) and Kaishi Sakane from Kyoto University have invested the lobby of ITER Headquarters for one week. Their challenge? To assemble 40,000 Lego bricks into a model of the ITER Tokamak. (Click to view larger version...)
Taishi Sugiyama (left) and Kaishi Sakane from Kyoto University have invested the lobby of ITER Headquarters for one week. Their challenge? To assemble 40,000 Lego bricks into a model of the ITER Tokamak.
Two students from Kyoto University (Konishi Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Energy) have set themselves a very ambitious challenge. Taishi Sugiyama and Kaishi Sakane, have given themselves four days to build an ITER Tokamak ... with a set of 40,000 Lego bricks!
 
The two students, who arrived early this morning at the Marseille airport, participated in the Kyoto University Student Challenge Contest and collected the necessary funds to travel to ITER.

With their temporary office in the lobby of ITER Headquarters, the two students are all set to build their third LEGO model of the ITER Tokamak. (Another of their masterpieces was on display at the ITER stand at last year's Fusion Energy Conference in Kyoto.) Good luck to them and see you in next week's Newsline for the final result!


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