Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER Council: project metrics confirm performance

    The governing body of the ITER Organization, the ITER Council, met for the twenty-first time on 15 and 16 November 2017 under the chairmanship of Won Namkung (K [...]

    Read more

  • COP 23 | Placing ITER on the global scene

    On the western bank of theRhine and not far from the seat of the UN Climate Change Secretariat, world leaders are discussing how to push ahead for international [...]

    Read more

  • Japan's MEXT Minister | Seeing is believing

    On 4 November, ITER received Yoshimasa Hayashi, the Japanese Minister of MEXT—the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology with oversight [...]

    Read more

  • Architect Engineer | ENGAGE receives prestigious award

    Since 2006, the French 'Grand Prix de l'Ingénierie' has recognized engineering projects and/or teams that are remarkable in terms of scope, innovation, complexi [...]

    Read more

  • Sub-assembly tools | One foot inside

    The twin Korean giants already have a foot inside the Assembly Hall—literally. The foot—or 'bottom inboard column' in ITER parlance—is a 4.4-metre-long steel [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Pouring concrete, with grace

With their slowly moving booms extended, concrete pumps are sometimes as gracious as ballet dancers. They definitely were on 24 March when concrete pouring began on Plot 7 of the second (above ground) storey of the bioshield.

Connected to mixer trucks by pipes running through the basement of the Tokamak Complex, the two pumps can deliver some 30 cubic metres of concrete per hour. (Click to view larger version...)
Connected to mixer trucks by pipes running through the basement of the Tokamak Complex, the two pumps can deliver some 30 cubic metres of concrete per hour.
Plot 7 is a special section of the concrete fortress that surrounds the machine: it is where the large openings for the neutral beam injectors (and their curious ovoid penetrations) are located.

The operation, which lasted for the better part of the day, consisted in pouring some 240 cubic metres of self-compacting concrete through dense rebar in order to form a wall 5.4 metres high.

The circular structure of the bioshield now rises dramatically at the center of the Tokamak Complex. As concrete pouring proceeds, workers on the L1 level of the building are busy handling a bundle of 12-metre-long bars for the steel reinforcement of the neutral beam cell slab. (Click to view larger version...)
The circular structure of the bioshield now rises dramatically at the center of the Tokamak Complex. As concrete pouring proceeds, workers on the L1 level of the building are busy handling a bundle of 12-metre-long bars for the steel reinforcement of the neutral beam cell slab.


return to the latest published articles