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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Lower cylinder | A transfer that felt like art

    Art has little to do with the transfer of a giant component. On Monday however, as ITER was preparing to celebrate Leonardo da Vinci's 500th anniversary, scienc [...]

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  • Event | ITER in Da Vinci mode

    'The most noble pleasure is the joy of understanding.' Written more than 500 years ago in the private journal of Leonardo da Vinci, these words still felt timel [...]

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  • Image of the week | When the Pit inspires an artist

    On a Sunday morning, when all is silent and still on the ITER platform, an eerie dimension is added to the Tokamak Pit. Hidden eyes seem to peer through the [...]

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  • Leonardo and innovation | In the steps of a giant

    To the members of a panel on innovation and Italian leadership, the moderator had one question: how do you see Leonardo da Vinci's scientific method—a systemati [...]

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  • Image of the week | Sandblasting

    Whether at home or in a nuclear installation, a painting job begins with surface preparation. In the ITER Tokamak Pit, close to 3,000 square metres of wall need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Along skid row

They look like perfectly aligned emergency housing units. But of course they're not: the 18 concrete structures in the ITER cryoplant are massive pads that will each support one 25-tonne helium compressor skid. What appears as "windows" in the concrete blocks are but passages for the dense interconnecting piping.

Work underway in the cryoplant to prepare for the arrival of 18 helium screw compressor skids. Each one of the 25-tonne units will be installed on top of its own four-metre-high concrete pad. (Click to view larger version...)
Work underway in the cryoplant to prepare for the arrival of 18 helium screw compressor skids. Each one of the 25-tonne units will be installed on top of its own four-metre-high concrete pad.
The concrete blocks are decoupled from the floor in order to prevent vibrations from being transmitted to other systems.
 
Eighteen helium compressor units will be grouped in the liquid helium plant and operated in parallel to provide the necessary gas flow for the liquid helium cooling needs of the Tokamak. The Compressor Building of the cryoplant will also house other helium compressors as well as compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant.
 
The helium compression system of the liquid helium plant involves the use of oil-flooded screw compressors and a large amount of oil. The fact that the compressors are installed at a height of approximately four metres allows the oil to regain the oil separation system through gravity.
 
In the 3,400 m² available in the Compressor Building, contractors will install 18 oil-flooded screw compressors for the helium plant as well as other helium compressors and compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant. (Click to view larger version...)
In the 3,400 m² available in the Compressor Building, contractors will install 18 oil-flooded screw compressors for the helium plant as well as other helium compressors and compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant.
Oil acts as a lubricant in the compressor system, and also takes away some of the heat from the cycle. Following compression, the helium (all oil removed) flows to the liquid helium cold boxes in the adjacent building.

In general, the heat generated by the compressors of the liquid helium plant will be evacuated by the flow of a large volume of cooling water—equivalent to 2,500 m3/hour. A part of the thermal energy will be recovered (approximately 12 MW) and used in the heating of other ITER buildings.

The Compressor Building occupies more than half of the space (3,400 m²) available in the cryoplant.


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