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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Image of the week | Tokamak-sur-mer

    At the height of the heat wave, in late June, surface temperature on the ITER worksite climbed to the 50 °C range. To continue work—and protect workers—a series [...]

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  • Space propulsion | Have fusion, will travel

    The idea of propelling rockets and spaceships using the power of the atom is nothing new: the Manhattan Project in the mid-1940s as well as countless endeavours [...]

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  • Cold fusion | End of story?

    Thirty years ago, two electrochemists at the University of Utah, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, created a sensation when they claimed they had achieved fu [...]

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  • Magnet feeders | Wave of deliveries ahead

    Several batches of magnet feeder components will arrive from China in September containing elements that need to be received, inspected and readied for installa [...]

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  • Tokamak cooling system procurement | Global team for better efficiency

    A unique work-sharing arrangement is expediting the design and fabrication of ITER's tokamak cooling water system and building the knowledge base that will be c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Along skid row

They look like perfectly aligned emergency housing units. But of course they're not: the 18 concrete structures in the ITER cryoplant are massive pads that will each support one 25-tonne helium compressor skid. What appears as "windows" in the concrete blocks are but passages for the dense interconnecting piping.

Work underway in the cryoplant to prepare for the arrival of 18 helium screw compressor skids. Each one of the 25-tonne units will be installed on top of its own four-metre-high concrete pad. (Click to view larger version...)
Work underway in the cryoplant to prepare for the arrival of 18 helium screw compressor skids. Each one of the 25-tonne units will be installed on top of its own four-metre-high concrete pad.
The concrete blocks are decoupled from the floor in order to prevent vibrations from being transmitted to other systems.
 
Eighteen helium compressor units will be grouped in the liquid helium plant and operated in parallel to provide the necessary gas flow for the liquid helium cooling needs of the Tokamak. The Compressor Building of the cryoplant will also house other helium compressors as well as compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant.
 
The helium compression system of the liquid helium plant involves the use of oil-flooded screw compressors and a large amount of oil. The fact that the compressors are installed at a height of approximately four metres allows the oil to regain the oil separation system through gravity.
 
In the 3,400 m² available in the Compressor Building, contractors will install 18 oil-flooded screw compressors for the helium plant as well as other helium compressors and compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant. (Click to view larger version...)
In the 3,400 m² available in the Compressor Building, contractors will install 18 oil-flooded screw compressors for the helium plant as well as other helium compressors and compressors for the liquid nitrogen plant.
Oil acts as a lubricant in the compressor system, and also takes away some of the heat from the cycle. Following compression, the helium (all oil removed) flows to the liquid helium cold boxes in the adjacent building.

In general, the heat generated by the compressors of the liquid helium plant will be evacuated by the flow of a large volume of cooling water—equivalent to 2,500 m3/hour. A part of the thermal energy will be recovered (approximately 12 MW) and used in the heating of other ITER buildings.

The Compressor Building occupies more than half of the space (3,400 m²) available in the cryoplant.


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