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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Construction | A new team of problem solvers

    Integrating the many systems that make up the Tokamak machine is a lot like delivering a clash-free layout for the engine room of a modern nuclear submarine, on [...]

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  • Fusion world | World's largest conference opens in Gandhi's hometown

    Mahatma Gandhi, whose mandir (a Hindi word for 'temple' or 'place of learning') is hosting the 27th edition of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fusion E [...]

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  • ITER | A day in the life of

    Seven hundred people took part in the ITER Organization's latest Open Doors Day event on Saturday 20 October. ITER opened its doors on a beautiful autumn day [...]

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  • Langmuir probes | Have heatshield, will travel

    Delivering components to the ITER site requires massive logistics ... most of the time. At others, an airline passenger's pocket suffices. Of course, it is a ma [...]

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  • Physics | 10th ITER International School in January

    The ITER International School aims to prepare young scientists/engineers for working in the field of nuclear fusion and in research applications associated with [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

The mega converters

They are the most recent additions to the ITER construction landscape. Long and low, the twin Magnet Power Conversion buildings are going up parallel to the ITER cryoplant. According to the ITER schedule, they will be ready for equipment before the end of the year.
 
Located between the 400 kV electrical switchyard and the Tokamak Complex, the Magnet Power Conversion buildings will furnish DC current to 10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets. (Click to view larger version...)
Located between the 400 kV electrical switchyard and the Tokamak Complex, the Magnet Power Conversion buildings will furnish DC current to 10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets.

The relatively straightforward structures—each 150 metres in length—are going up rapidly on the ITER site. At the same time, contractors are finalizing buried technical galleries between the buildings. By the end of the year, contractors will begin installing the equipment. (Click to view larger version...)
The relatively straightforward structures—each 150 metres in length—are going up rapidly on the ITER site. At the same time, contractors are finalizing buried technical galleries between the buildings. By the end of the year, contractors will begin installing the equipment.

Densely packed with electrical converters, switches and fast discharge units, the twin Magnet Power Conversion buildings act as an AC/DC converter for the ITER magnetic system. The procurement responsibility for the electrical equipment in the buildings is shared by Korea (18 converter units and one master control system), China (14 converter units), and Russia (fast discharge units and some 2.5 kilometres of busbars). (Click to view larger version...)
Densely packed with electrical converters, switches and fast discharge units, the twin Magnet Power Conversion buildings act as an AC/DC converter for the ITER magnetic system. The procurement responsibility for the electrical equipment in the buildings is shared by Korea (18 converter units and one master control system), China (14 converter units), and Russia (fast discharge units and some 2.5 kilometres of busbars).



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