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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | First production unit in China

    Bolted in a perfect circle to the pedestal ring of the cryostat base, 18 gravity supports will brace the curved outer edge of each toroidal field coil. These un [...]

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  • Conference | Fun-filled vacuum

    The science of ITER is not simple. But with a bit of imagination (and a dose of humour) a way can be found to convey the most complex physics notions to a publi [...]

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  • Naive question of the week | What happens to the car keys?

    We begin today a new series that aims to answer basic, even naive, questions about fusion and ITER. An image used often, when trying to convey the amount of e [...]

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  • Metrology | Facing the millimetre test

    In the realm of the very large at ITER, some of the biggest challenges are lurking down in the millimetre range. Within the Assembly Building a massive struct [...]

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  • Fusion research in Europe | Working it out together

    In Europe, fusion research is structured around a goal-oriented roadmap that closely involves universities, research laboratories and industry. Sibylle Günter, [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Image of the week

Hooked!

Big, powerful cranes need big, powerful hooks.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The hook pictured in this image is one of four that belong to the double overhead bridge crane installed 43 metres above the floor in the Assembly Hall.

The double crane is made of two pairs of girders and corresponding trolleys (see diagram). The hooks are attached below by two redundant cables wound eight times in a pulley block.

Each hook has a lifting capacity of 375 tonnes.

Behind the blue hook in the photo is the yellow lifting beam (see diagram) that will be used to manoeuvre the heaviest machine components such as the vacuum vessel sector assemblies or the central solenoid.

 (Click to view larger version...)
The "1385 t" that we see mentioned refers to the operational lifting capacity of the whole system (1,500 tonnes) minus the dead load of the lifting beam.

Lifting tests with dummy loads (1,875 tonnes) are scheduled in December.


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