Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Construction | Art around every corner

    Most of us have experienced it. Turning a corner in one of the Tokamak Building galleries and looking up at the graphic pattern of embedded plates in the concre [...]

    Read more

  • Machine | Ensuring port plugs will work as planned

    The stainless steel plugs sealing off each Tokamak port opening are not only massive, they are also complex—carrying and protecting some of the precious payload [...]

    Read more

  • Networks | Ensuring real-time distributed computing at ITER

    Many of the control systems at ITER require quick response and a high degree of determinism. If commands go out late, the state of the machine may have changed [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion codes and standards | Award for ITER Japan's Hideo Nakajima

    Hideo Nakajima, a senior engineer at ITER Japan, has received an award from the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) for his contribution to the develop [...]

    Read more

  • Machine assembly | First magnet in place

    When it travelled the ITER Itinerary last year, or during cold tests in the onsite winding facility, poloidal field coil #6 (PF6) felt rather large and massive. [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Milestones

Japan completes central solenoid conductor

The Japanese Domestic Agency has successfully completed the procurement of 43 kilometres (700 tonnes) of niobium-tin cable-in-conduit superconductor for ITER's central solenoid magnet.

The last crate of spooled conductor has now left Japan for the coil manufacturer in the United States. In an eight-year campaign to design, test and produce the central solenoid conductor, Japanese industry manufactured 43 kilometres (some 700 tonnes) of material. (Click to view larger version...)
The last crate of spooled conductor has now left Japan for the coil manufacturer in the United States. In an eight-year campaign to design, test and produce the central solenoid conductor, Japanese industry manufactured 43 kilometres (some 700 tonnes) of material.
The central solenoid is tower-shaped magnet in the centre of the machine that will induce a powerful current in the ITER plasma and maintain it during long plasma pulses. Thirteen metres tall (18 metres, with structure), four metres wide and one thousand tonnes, the central solenoid is made of six independent coil packs wound from niobium-tin superconductor.

The Japanese Domestic Agency for ITER is responsible for supplying 100 percent of the central solenoid conductors. Eight years after the Procurement Arrangement was signed with the ITER Organization, the full scope has been achieved.

Forty-nine unit lengths of superconductor have now been shipped to the United States, where coil manufacturing is underway at General Atomics (San Diego, California) under the procurement responsibility of the US Domestic Agency.

The ITER central solenoid will top the charts as the largest solenoid ever built for a fusion device. Maximum field of 13 tesla will be reached in the centre of the central solenoid for a current of 40 kA (up to a maximum of 46 kA in some modules).

Superconductors such as these—successfully developed to reach such demanding technical specifications—can also be expected to have applications in the fields of superconducting power transmission, systems for electricity storage, and the miniaturization of medical accelerators.

Read the press release in Japanese on the QST website (National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology).




return to the latest published articles