Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryolines | Not just any pipes

    In order to produce and sustain plasmas ten times hotter than the core of the Sun, some essential elements of the ITER machine need to be cooled to temperatures [...]

    Read more

  • Symposium in Japan | Fusion attracts strong political support

    A recent symposium in Japan on fusion energy attracted 500 participants. The Fusion Energy Forum of Japan was established in 2002 for the purpose of promoting [...]

    Read more

  • Fiction | "Steampunk" fusion machine travels in time

    Ever since a 'Mr Fusion' device appeared on Doc's time-travelling DeLorean in the first opus of the Back to the Future trilogy (1985), fusion energy has exerted [...]

    Read more

  • Construction | Honouring the crown mockup

    Medieval stone masons used to engrave their personal mark on the walls and pillars of the cathedrals they contributed to building. Their present-day counterpart [...]

    Read more

  • Neutral beam diagnostics | Right in the line of the beam

    A high-precision diagnostic is about to enter into service at the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, where scientists are testing key aspects of ITER's external h [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Milestones

Japan completes central solenoid conductor

The Japanese Domestic Agency has successfully completed the procurement of 43 kilometres (700 tonnes) of niobium-tin cable-in-conduit superconductor for ITER's central solenoid magnet.

The last crate of spooled conductor has now left Japan for the coil manufacturer in the United States. In an eight-year campaign to design, test and produce the central solenoid conductor, Japanese industry manufactured 43 kilometres (some 700 tonnes) of material. (Click to view larger version...)
The last crate of spooled conductor has now left Japan for the coil manufacturer in the United States. In an eight-year campaign to design, test and produce the central solenoid conductor, Japanese industry manufactured 43 kilometres (some 700 tonnes) of material.
The central solenoid is tower-shaped magnet in the centre of the machine that will induce a powerful current in the ITER plasma and maintain it during long plasma pulses. Thirteen metres tall (18 metres, with structure), four metres wide and one thousand tonnes, the central solenoid is made of six independent coil packs wound from niobium-tin superconductor.

The Japanese Domestic Agency for ITER is responsible for supplying 100 percent of the central solenoid conductors. Eight years after the Procurement Arrangement was signed with the ITER Organization, the full scope has been achieved.

Forty-nine unit lengths of superconductor have now been shipped to the United States, where coil manufacturing is underway at General Atomics (San Diego, California) under the procurement responsibility of the US Domestic Agency.

The ITER central solenoid will top the charts as the largest solenoid ever built for a fusion device. Maximum field of 13 tesla will be reached in the centre of the central solenoid for a current of 40 kA (up to a maximum of 46 kA in some modules).

Superconductors such as these—successfully developed to reach such demanding technical specifications—can also be expected to have applications in the fields of superconducting power transmission, systems for electricity storage, and the miniaturization of medical accelerators.

Read the press release in Japanese on the QST website (National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology).




return to the latest published articles