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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat | As clean as a freshly minted coin

    Before it is encased in its protective cocoon and moved to temporary storage, the cryostat upper cylinder must be cleaned. The operation is both low-tech and es [...]

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  • Top management | Alain Bécoulet, Head of Engineering

    When Alain Bécoulet embraced plasma physics back in the mid-1980s as a student at France's prestigious École Normale Supérieure, he did it for two reasons: one [...]

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  • Science | New steady state analysis

    Recent research shows it should be possible to reach steady-state fusion production in ITER with the baseline mix of heating and current drive systems, in parti [...]

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  • Image of the week | Like dancers in a vertical ballet

    Of all the movements of workers and equipment in the Assembly Hall, these are the most gracious... Like ballet dancers on a vertical stage, two workers are b [...]

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  • Cryostat base | Grand opening soon

    Picture a giant soup plate, 30 metres in diameter, slowing descending into a deep concrete cylinder. Track the near imperceptible movement of the double overhea [...]

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Of Interest

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Images of the week

Three years of progress

Three years ago in late March, the most imposing features on the ITER platform were the workshops for the cryostat (left) and the poloidal field coils (right)—vast facilities where the manufacturing and/or assembly of some of ITER's largest components was set to begin.

 (Click to view larger version...)
Construction of the Assembly Hall had just begun, and the first steel pillars had been installed on opposite sides of the building's concrete floor slab. In the 90 x 130 metre area reserved for the Tokamak Complex, nothing yet had emerged above the platform level—work was concentrated at the level of the B2 slab, where preparatory works were underway for the construction of the bioshield.

 (Click to view larger version...)
Three years later the difference is striking. In this picture taken last week from the same angle, the 60-metre-tall Assembly Hall and its poster of the ITER Tokamak are a towering presence that completely hides the Cryostat Workshop from view. To the right, the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility is masked by a cluster of plant buildings.

And in the area of the Tokamak Complex, some of the walls now stand four storeys above platform level and the massive 30-metre-tall bioshield has been finalized.

However impressive the photo comparison may be, a large part of the progress that ITER has achieved since 2015 cannot be detected in these snapshots. Hundreds of components, both large and small, have been manufactured and safely delivered to the construction site. Many more—among them some of the largest and most challenging ITER components—are in various stages of advanced fabrication or factory acceptance testing.

According to the stringent metrics that monitor project performance ITER has now completed 53.7% of the total work scope on the road to First Plasma (calculated on the base of all design, construction, manufacturing, delivery, assembly, installation, and commissioning activities).


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