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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Component delivery| A jewel in a box

    Sailing under the flag of Germany, the Regine is a mighty ship, strengthened for heavy cargo and equipped on its portside with two 750-tonne on-board cranes. Ha [...]

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  • Education | Make your own tokamak with 3D printing!

    It's not Lego, but it is definitely 'hands-on.' To offer a tangible device to illustrate the workings of magnetic confinement fusion in a tokamak, the ITER Orga [...]

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  • Worksite | Europe's Fusion for Energy is building the ITER installation

    Anyone driving to ITER can take full measure of the enormity of the project a few kilometers before reaching the destination. Gigantic cranes can be seen from a [...]

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  • Disruption mitigation | Experts in plasma disruptions gather online

    On 20-23 July, 120 international experts participated in the 1st IAEA Technical Meeting on Plasma Disruptions and their Mitigation, jointly organized by the Int [...]

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  • Start of assembly | World dignitaries celebrate a collaborative achievement

    Due to the constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the crowd in the ITER Assembly Hall was small. But thanks to live broadcasting and video feed, the audi [...]

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Of Interest

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Photo report

Ring magnet fabrication in full swing

At least as wide as a five-lane highway, ITER's largest ring-shaped magnets are too big to be transported in their finished state. The European Domestic Agency has purpose built a facility at ITER to house their fabrication only a few hundred metres from machine assembly pit. This report will take you inside the building, where a team of 70 is advancing the fabrication of the first production unit—poloidal field coil #5 (PF5).

Beginning with conductor winding and ending—at the other side of the 257-metre-long facility—with final assembly and cold testing, the fabrication of ITER's ring shaped magnets is a precise step-by-step process. (Click to view larger version...)
Beginning with conductor winding and ending—at the other side of the 257-metre-long facility—with final assembly and cold testing, the fabrication of ITER's ring shaped magnets is a precise step-by-step process.

Six ring-shaped poloidal field coils will be positioned horizontally outside of the toroidal field magnet system to shape the plasma and contribute to its stability by "pinching" it away from the walls.

Of the six coils—which range in diameter from 17 metres to 24 metres, and in weight from 200 to 400 tonnes—the European Domestic Agency, Fusion for Energy, is responsible for five. (A sixth is under the procurement responsibility of Russia.) In the facility on site, work on PF5 is 42 percent completed.

See the gallery below and a full report on the European Domestic Agency website.


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