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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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  • Coping with COVID | Adjusting to maintain progress

    COVID-19 needs no introduction. But for a 35-country collaboration like ITER, the dramatic worldwide spread of the virus has introduced an entirely new set of c [...]

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  • United States | A roadmap to fusion energy

    Hundreds of scientists across the United States—representing a broad range of national labs, universities, and private ventures—have collaborated to produce A C [...]

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Of Interest

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Platform

The future

In a few years, reality will reflect this artist's rendition of the completed ITER platform.

This is what the near future will look like... (Courtesy of Fusion for Energy) (Click to view larger version...)
This is what the near future will look like... (Courtesy of Fusion for Energy)
Civil work on the ITER site is approximately 70 percent achieved for First Plasma building scope. In this diagram, buildings that do not yet exist are coloured in light blue—for example the neutral beam power infrastructure (centre right), the ITER Hot Cell Building (centre left) and the Control Building (left).

The Tokamak Complex is coloured in light mauve because—although its concrete walls have reached their maximum height (except in the Tritium Building)—it does not yet have its "steel cap." Once achieved, the steel structure will create a vast open space for the bridge cranes to deliver machine components to the Tokamak Pit.

And of course, down the road, the entire Tokamak Complex will be clad with the stainless steel that has been for many years now the architectural signature of ITER.

This rendition was produced by Fusion for Energy's Martial Boulguy. For a high-resolution pdf version (uncoloured), please see ITER posters here.


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