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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite | First pillars for the crane hall

    For the overhead cranes to deliver machine components into the Tokamak assembly pit, the rails that carry them need to be extended some 80 metres beyond the tem [...]

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  • Transport | 300 tonnes of equipment on its way to ITER

    A specially designed assembly tool and elements of the cryostat and vacuum vessel thermal shields are part of the shipments travelling now from Korea to ITER. W [...]

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  • Fusion world | A new tokamak in town

    After EAST in China and WEST in France, another of the cardinal points of the compass has been chosen to name a tokamak. Introducing NORTH—the NORdic Tokamak de [...]

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  • Opportunities | Bringing the ITER Business Forum to Washington

    Every second year, a two-day ITER Business Forum is held to invite existing and potential suppliers for the ITER Project—laboratories, universities, and compani [...]

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  • World Energy Congress | Fusion "at a time of transition"

    In the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi is often referred to as a tourism hotspot that combines luxury and ancient traditions. In September, Abu Dhabi was in the [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Paint job

One level done, five to go

The job is done and the effect is spectacular. At the deepest basement level (B2) of the Tokamak Building, the floors, walls, and ceilings are now perfectly white.

The embedded plates on the walls and ceiling of the lowest basement level of the Tokamak Building (B2) draw a pattern that is evocative of a contemporary art installation. (Click to view larger version...)
The embedded plates on the walls and ceiling of the lowest basement level of the Tokamak Building (B2) draw a pattern that is evocative of a contemporary art installation.
Sandblasting these vast surfaces prior to applying several layers of thick nuclear paint required more than 112 tonnes of abrasive material. In six months of painting, 30 tonnes of resin, primer and paint along with countless brushes and rolls were consumed.

Level B2 accounts for only one-sixth of the total surfaces to be painted in the Tokamak Building, not counting the central Tokamak Pit, which is a mammoth job in itself.

Last week, personnel from ITER Organization; the European Domestic Agency, Fusion for Energy; architect-engineer ENGAGE; and contractor Prezioso (specialized in the painting of nuclear buildings) did a final inspection check. With a few touch ups here and there, the job was considered done and well done.


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