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  • Component delivery| A jewel in a box

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  • Worksite | Europe's Fusion for Energy is building the ITER installation

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  • Disruption mitigation | Experts in plasma disruptions gather online

    On 20-23 July, 120 international experts participated in the 1st IAEA Technical Meeting on Plasma Disruptions and their Mitigation, jointly organized by the Int [...]

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  • Start of assembly | World dignitaries celebrate a collaborative achievement

    Due to the constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the crowd in the ITER Assembly Hall was small. But thanks to live broadcasting and video feed, the audi [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Paint job

One level done, five to go

The job is done and the effect is spectacular. At the deepest basement level (B2) of the Tokamak Building, the floors, walls, and ceilings are now perfectly white.

The embedded plates on the walls and ceiling of the lowest basement level of the Tokamak Building (B2) draw a pattern that is evocative of a contemporary art installation. (Click to view larger version...)
The embedded plates on the walls and ceiling of the lowest basement level of the Tokamak Building (B2) draw a pattern that is evocative of a contemporary art installation.
Sandblasting these vast surfaces prior to applying several layers of thick nuclear paint required more than 112 tonnes of abrasive material. In six months of painting, 30 tonnes of resin, primer and paint along with countless brushes and rolls were consumed.

Level B2 accounts for only one-sixth of the total surfaces to be painted in the Tokamak Building, not counting the central Tokamak Pit, which is a mammoth job in itself.

Last week, personnel from ITER Organization; the European Domestic Agency, Fusion for Energy; architect-engineer ENGAGE; and contractor Prezioso (specialized in the painting of nuclear buildings) did a final inspection check. With a few touch ups here and there, the job was considered done and well done.


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