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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryolines | Another day, another spool

    Having wedged his body and equipment into the cramped space between the ceiling and the massive pipe, a worker is busy welding two cryolines spools. A few metre [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bearings unveiled

    The construction teams are in the last stages of preparing the Tokamak pit for the first major operation of ITER machine assembly: the lowering of the cryostat [...]

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  • Technology | Perfecting tritium breeding for DEMO and beyond

    While ITER will never breed tritium for its own consumption, it will test breeding blanket concepts—the tools and techniques that designers of future DEMO react [...]

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  • Fusion world | Japan and Europe complete the assembly of JT-60SA

    The JT-60SA fusion experiment in Naka, Japan, is designed to explore advanced plasma physics in support of the operation of ITER and next-phase devices. After s [...]

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  • Manufacturing | Thermal shield milestone in Korea

    Six years after the start of fabrication, Korean contractor SFA has completed the last 40° sector of vacuum vessel thermal shield. The stainless steel panels, c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Nobel Laureates

How can science change the world for the better?

Every year, a group of Nobel Laureates convenes in Lindau, Germany, for a week of interaction with young scientists from all over the world. ITER was invited to take part this year in a panel discussion titled "How Can Science Change the World for the Better?"

ITER's Chief Scientist Tim Luce, far right, participates in the closing session of the 69th Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany. (Click to view larger version...)
ITER's Chief Scientist Tim Luce, far right, participates in the closing session of the 69th Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany.
Created in 1951 to foster the exchange among scientists of different generations, cultures, and disciplines, the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings seek to inspire and excite by creating a forum for interaction between world-recognized specialists and the scientists of the future.

For this year's 69th edition—dedicated to physics—580 undergraduates, PhD students and postdoctoral researchers were invited from 89 countries. Thirty-nine Nobel Laureates in Physics took part in the event.

Speaking to the next generation of leading scientists ... (Click to view larger version...)
Speaking to the next generation of leading scientists ...
For the final panel discussion on "How Can Science Change the World for the Better?" the ITER Project had a place at the table. Tim Luce, Head of the Science & Operations Department and Chief Scientist, participated in the discussion with Nobel Laureates Steven Chu (1997 Nobel Prize in Physics, former US Secretary of Energy), Vinton Cerf (co-inventor of the internet, now with Google), Adriana Marais (advocate for human space travel to Mars), and Brian Schmidt (2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, Vice-Chancellor of Australian National University).

Led by moderator Karan Khemka, the discussion ranged from sustainable development, to the rise of artificial intelligence, to the role of scientists in society. ITER's presence was important, because these young scientists are part of the generation that will need to learn from ITER and put the planet on a path to a fusion-powered economy.

No guarantees, but that really could change the world for the better.


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