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Of Interest

See archived entries

Worksite

Major progress you don't see from the air

There was a time when aerial pictures of the ITER worksite taken at six-month intervals showed spectacular change. Buildings and structures sprouted from previously vacant lots, new levels were added to existing constructions, and progress was strikingly visible.

Looking over the main ITER site and an auxiliary storage platform (left) from a northeastern angle. One of the four tall cranes that had stood over the Tokamak Building has now been dismantled. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche (Click to view larger version...)
Looking over the main ITER site and an auxiliary storage platform (left) from a northeastern angle. One of the four tall cranes that had stood over the Tokamak Building has now been dismantled. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche
Today, most of the action takes place inside the buildings, where equipment is being installed, components unpacked and tools prepared for upcoming assembly tasks. Progress remains steady, but it is now rarely visible from the air.

As a consequence, playing "spot the differences" between an aerial photograph from a few days ago with one taken in late May is becoming a difficult game. Still, the differences are there. Can you spot them?

As night falls the ITER site glows red and orange. In front of the Tokamak Complex, construction materials that had been stored have been cleared to make room for three new buildings to house the power supplies for the heating neutral beam system. Farther left, space has also been made for early work on the Control Building. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche (Click to view larger version...)
As night falls the ITER site glows red and orange. In front of the Tokamak Complex, construction materials that had been stored have been cleared to make room for three new buildings to house the power supplies for the heating neutral beam system. Farther left, space has also been made for early work on the Control Building. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche




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