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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Image of the Week | Hard work deserves an outdoor buffet

    A start-of-summer event was held on Friday 21 June for the ITER community—an occasion to celebrate the everyday commitment of staff and contractors alike, acros [...]

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  • Poloidal field coils | Reflecting on a unique industrial achievement

    They had worked together for 10 years. And on Thursday 20 June, they gathered one last time to reflect on what they had accomplished. Director-General Pietro Ba [...]

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  • 34th ITER Council | Updated baseline presented

    Nearly 100 people met for two days last week for the 34th Meeting of the ITER Council. The meeting was an important one, as the ITER Organization and the D [...]

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  • Cryopumps | First unit reaches ITER

    The ITER vacuum team, the European Domestic Agency Fusion for Energy, Research Instruments (RI), and the ITER Director-General were all excited to welcome the d [...]

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  • Tritium Plant Summit | A shared vision to prepare for delivery

    A summit organized at ITER Headquarters from 3 to 6 June brought together the international teams that will deliver the sub-systems of the ITER Tritium Plant. I [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Utilities

Directly from producer to consumer

When fully operational, ITER will be like a large living being with fluids rushing through kilometres of veins and arteries to organs located throughout the installation. By way of pumps, valves and compressors, powerful flows of air, water, helium and nitrogen will be pushed through a ramified network of underground pipes and delivered to a large variety of "clients." In early February, the first connection between producer and consumer was successfully established, delivering compressed air to the cryoplant's hundreds of pneumatic activators.

Densely packed with a large variety of equipment (pictured: the demineralized water unit), the Site Services Building will produce and distribute utilities throughout the installation. From left to right: Alexandre Marc, test and commisioning controller (Engage); Isabelle Gentili, principal shift operator (ITER Organization); Frédéric Debert, test and commisioning supervisor (Engage). (Click to view larger version...)
Densely packed with a large variety of equipment (pictured: the demineralized water unit), the Site Services Building will produce and distribute utilities throughout the installation. From left to right: Alexandre Marc, test and commisioning controller (Engage); Isabelle Gentili, principal shift operator (ITER Organization); Frédéric Debert, test and commisioning supervisor (Engage).
The main utilities production facility at ITER is the 80-metre-long Site Services Building, located near the Tokamak Complex. Despite its unassuming name, the building will play a strategic role in the daily pulsing and throbbing of the ITER installation. Densely packed with a large variety of equipment—a demineralized water plant, chiller systems, air compressors, dozens of pumps and kilometres of piping—the facility will produce and distribute compressed and breathable air (for operators in ventilated nuclear suits), demineralized water for cooling circuits and detritiation systems, and cold water for air conditioning systems.

The compressed and breathable air facility can deliver 5,000 cubic metres per hour at a pressure of 10 bar. (Click to view larger version...)
The compressed and breathable air facility can deliver 5,000 cubic metres per hour at a pressure of 10 bar.
Whether liquid of gaseous, the volumes produced will be considerable: the compressed air units for instance can deliver 5,000 cubic metres per hour at a pressure of 10 bar; the production capacity for demineralized water is approximately 34 cubic metres per hour.

The facility hosts systems that produce, chemically treat and send compressed air and gases flowing to clients through the piping network. Hot water is produced in another unit hosting the largest electrical boiler in Europe. Gaseous helium for small consumers such as valves and local testing and inspection systems comes from bottle racks. Gaseous nitrogen extracted from the atmosphere by systems located in the cryoplant will be dedicated to the inerting of glove-boxes and other enclosures, valve actuation, ventilation for tritiated water holding tanks, and ventilation for cooling water system users like drying systems and nitrogen-based pressurizers and valves.

Utilities are distributed through an underground network of approximately 20 kilometres of piping. (Click to view larger version...)
Utilities are distributed through an underground network of approximately 20 kilometres of piping.
Connecting the compressed air distribution network to the cryoplant was an essential step in the testing of the facility's 1,500 pneumatic actuators and hundreds of control valves. An integrated team composed of ITER operators and European staff from Fusion for Energy and Engage have been working closely together to achieve this milestone. The demineralized water system will be next, and progressively, one by one, all the clients throughout the installation on the platform will be served.



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