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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Transition | Eisuke Tada takes over the leadership of the ITER Project

    Eisuke Tada, from Japan, assumes the interim role of Director-General of the ITER Organization in the wake of the passing of Director-General Bernard Bigot. De [...]

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  • Tokamak assembly | The "module" has landed

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  • On site | A visit from Gabriela Hearst and the Chloé team

    The ITER Project is renowned for being on the cutting-edge of many fields of design—but fashion design, haute couture, is not one of them. So it was a fascinati [...]

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  • Video | Watch the Big Lift!

    A component towering six storeys high and weighing the equivalent of four fully loaded Boeing 747s is lifted out of tooling and transferred into the assembly pi [...]

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  • Remembering Bernard Bigot, ITER Director-General 2015-2022

    On the ITER site, the machinery of construction was humming just like on any weekday. Workers were concentrating on their tasks, laying rebar for new buildings [...]

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Of Interest

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On site

A quick visit to the Control Building

Work is progressing on the ITER Control Building, ergonomically designed for the 60 to 80 operators, engineers and researchers who will call it home. Newsline paid a quick visit to the construction site last week.

Work is progressing on the 3,500-square metre, three-storey ITER Control Building. Scientists, engineers and operators will work from here to monitor machine operation and analyze the data they receive from each pulse. (Click to view larger version...)
Work is progressing on the 3,500-square metre, three-storey ITER Control Building. Scientists, engineers and operators will work from here to monitor machine operation and analyze the data they receive from each pulse.
As the heart and vital organs of ITER will beat and pulse in the Tokamak Complex and in the various facilities spread over the installation's platform, the brain that commands them will occupy a 3,500-square-metre, three-storey structure providing space for the control and server rooms, offices, meeting rooms and support facilities.

The ITER Control Building will be the daily work environment for the operators, researchers, and engineers running ITER physics experiments or the routine 24-hour operation and control functions of the machine and plant. A good deal of planning has gone into the design of the different spaces to create a "liveable" environment—one that is conducive to focus and concentration, yet that also encourages interaction and communication between the teams. Lighting, materials, acoustics, temperature, airflow, noise levels, the colour and arrangement of displays, seating and furniture, rest areas ... all of these elements have been carefully studied and organized.

The main control room will be staffed on a 24-hour-per-day, continuous basis for the operational life of the ITER facility. It will be a large chamber with an open floor plan, seven-metre ceilings, natural light, large-screen displays, desks grouped by task or unit, and a glass-walled visitor gallery.

A second, backup control room will be housed in a seismically protected nuclear building to ensure plant functionality in all circumstances.

See the gallery below for the most recent photos of construction.



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