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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER DNA | A "case" study...

    In December last year, and again this year in early May, pre-welding fitting tests demonstrated that steel components as tall as a four-storey building (and wei [...]

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  • First plasma| Temporary in-vessel protection

    The vacuum vessel, the operating theatre of the ITER machine, needs to be protected against possible damage from the hot plasma at any given time during its ope [...]

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  • Divertor cassettes | Successful prototypes open way to series

    Before embarking on the fabrication of the 54 complex steel structures that will form a ring at the bottom of the ITER machine—the divertor cassettes—the Europe [...]

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  • Images of the week | Titan tool 90 percent complete

    Towering 22 metres above ground and weighing approximately 800 tonnes, the twin sector sub-assembly tools (SSAT) are formidable handling machines that will be u [...]

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  • Video | How does the ITER cryoplant work?

    Cold is essential to ITER—10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, the thermal shield that surrounds the machine, the cryopumps that achieve the high vacuum in [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

The flagpole has gone

The Tokamak Pit seen from the east, with the concrete columns of the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility looming in the clear blue Provencal sky at the far end. (Click to view larger version...)
The Tokamak Pit seen from the east, with the concrete columns of the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility looming in the clear blue Provencal sky at the far end.
The flagpole that has been marking the future centre of the ITER Tokamak ever since the first site clearing works commenced in 2006 has finally been moved aside. The earth and concrete in which it stood over the last four years is gone. These days, huge dump trucks are removing the top soil and dynamite is taking care of the rocky rest. The excavation of the ITER Tokamak Pit is in full swing; the open heart surgery has begun.

For the Tokamak, the pit will have to be excavated down to a depth of 20 metres, whereas for the Hot Cell, which is directly adjacent, the shovels will have to dig down to at least 12 metres. From time to time, analytical measurements record the geological characteristics of the rock foundation.

The columns will soon carry the main crane beams of the Coils Winding Facility. (Click to view larger version...)
The columns will soon carry the main crane beams of the Coils Winding Facility.
Just a hundred metres away from the pit, tall concrete columns of almost 10 metres in height loom into the clear blue Provencal sky, soon to carry the main crane beams of the winding facility for ITER's poloidal field coils.



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