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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Component delivery| A jewel in a box

    Sailing under the flag of Germany, the Regine is a mighty ship, strengthened for heavy cargo and equipped on its portside with two 750-tonne on-board cranes. Ha [...]

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  • Education | Make your own tokamak with 3D printing!

    It's not Lego, but it is definitely 'hands-on.' To offer a tangible device to illustrate the workings of magnetic confinement fusion in a tokamak, the ITER Orga [...]

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  • Worksite | Europe's Fusion for Energy is building the ITER installation

    Anyone driving to ITER can take full measure of the enormity of the project a few kilometers before reaching the destination. Gigantic cranes can be seen from a [...]

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  • Disruption mitigation | Experts in plasma disruptions gather online

    On 20-23 July, 120 international experts participated in the 1st IAEA Technical Meeting on Plasma Disruptions and their Mitigation, jointly organized by the Int [...]

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  • Start of assembly | World dignitaries celebrate a collaborative achievement

    Due to the constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the crowd in the ITER Assembly Hall was small. But thanks to live broadcasting and video feed, the audi [...]

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Of Interest

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Almost there!

Sabina Griffith

The last blast is done ... and concrete about to be poured. (Click to view larger version...)
The last blast is done ... and concrete about to be poured.
The excavation works for the ITER Tokamak Pit are making impressive progress: this week on Thursday the last blasting took place. The 87 x 123-metre pit is now officially 298.65 metres above sea level—which means that the ultimate depth of 17 metres is almost achieved. "We are well on schedule," said Jean Desfarges, construction manager for ENGAGE, the company in charge of the follow-up of the excavation work on behalf of the European ITER Domestic Agency. "The next step now is to finalize the survey of the underlying rock for which 660 boreholes will be drilled. Then, a 5 centimetre blinding layer of concrete will be poured before the thick, 1.5 metre concrete slab is filled in."


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