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Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

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  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

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  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

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  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

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  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

ITER fuel: High tech and smart people

-Sabina Griffith

Osamu Motojima, Director-General of the ITER Organization, attending the reception on Capitol Hill. (Click to view larger version...)
Osamu Motojima, Director-General of the ITER Organization, attending the reception on Capitol Hill.
While on Capitol Hill in Washington the Federal Budget (and thus the budgets for many American scientific endeavors) was eagerly disputed this week, only a stone's throw away in the Rayburn Building the ITER project stepped onto an exceptional stage by inviting members of the US Congress to an evening reception.

Amongst the guests that evening was Congressman Rush Holt from New Jersey, introduced as having "a long history in fusion" by Thom Mason, Director of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). "A long history...and I hope a future too!" countered Holt.

From left to right: Stewart Prager; Ned Sauthoff; Ed Synakowski; Bill Brinkman; Osamu Motojima, Thom Mason and Terry Michalske (Click to view larger version...)
From left to right: Stewart Prager; Ned Sauthoff; Ed Synakowski; Bill Brinkman; Osamu Motojima, Thom Mason and Terry Michalske
The evening reception was hosted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its partners in the U.S. ITER project: Stewart Prager, Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Terry Michalske, Director of the Savannah River National Laboratory. The event gathered many key people within the US fusion community such as William Brinkman, the Director of the Office of Science within the Department of Energy; Ed Synakowski, the Associate Director for Fusion Energy Sciences within the Office of Science; U.S. ITER Project Director, Ned Sauthoff; Fusion Power Associates Dale Meade and Stephen Dean; representatives from US ITER suppliers AREVA Federal Services, Luvata Waterbury and Oxford Superconducting Technology USA; and - last but not least - the Director-General of the ITER Organization, Osamu Motojima.

Thomas Vanek, from the US Department of Energy, welcoming guests to the reception. (Click to view larger version...)
Thomas Vanek, from the US Department of Energy, welcoming guests to the reception.
The gathering aimed to "provide the delegates with information about the ITER project and the important role of the United States in this next step toward fusion energy as a power source". As Thom Mason put it: "ITER is a challenging project fuelled by high tech and smart brains. A project that will move us toward a promising long-term solution to the energy challenge. Fusion energy has the potential to be a major contributor to the global supply of energy."

The total budget for the U.S. ITER project is $2.2 billion, or about 9% of the total cost of ITER, Mason pointed out. "In return, we will have access to 100% of the technology and research benefits of ITER. We are gaining experience in the design, construction, and operation of a reactor-scale fusion facility."

So far, the U.S. ITER project has awarded more than $90 million in procurements to U.S. industry and universities; U.S. industry is also winning contracts to supply other ITER Members. "Together," Mason said, "we are playing an essential role in an extraordinary international research partnership."


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